What do you use for heat in the shop? - Page 5

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Thread: What do you use for heat in the shop?

  1. #41
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    Display Name: Greg

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    my old place has street fed Natural gas 80K btu furnace works awesome I miss it, It keeps the tenants cars warm now, New place no street natural gas so I use Electric Mini Split for the house 4 car garage as it has conditioned living space above aka Mom in Law apartment.

    My place is down the hill 20x26 post and beam garn that I am converting into a garage with a lift. It has a large older style cast iron barrel stove. Makes too much heat as I have had to open the louvers for when it was a sugar shack to cool it down. Nothing wrong with being too warm

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  3. #42
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    Display Name: ja318

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    I just got a 75 btu propane works great had a salamandor cant take the smell of kero work construction smell it all winter long

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  5. #44
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    Display Name: David C.Dunbar

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    I maintain my machine shop at 67-68 deg. 24-7. Tools and materials are constant temp and dimension for accuracy. Propane is safe & convenient, plus no fumes. Yes it costs but winter is just a few months, Right?

  6. #45
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    Display Name: Grant Baker
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    Winter is a fact of life up here David,ya gotta stay warm
    ,1966 60 parts tractor,1968 60 w/mower,1968 110 side tag w/ 43 snow blade, 1968 110 w/1974 80 cart,1968 112 w/mower,1969 110 w/Haban 420W sickle mower,1972 110,​1997 LX277 w/mower and blower,43C center blade

  7. #46
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    Grant, I wish the shop didn't need to be that warm, but it's necessary. Being retired doesn't help w/ the expense. We keep the house at 62F unless someone's ill.

  8. #47
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    I keep my garage at 70 all winter,the house too until my wife gets home then its down to 68.My thinking is that when you have it to a temp you like,it takes nothing to maintain that temp
    ,1966 60 parts tractor,1968 60 w/mower,1968 110 side tag w/ 43 snow blade, 1968 110 w/1974 80 cart,1968 112 w/mower,1969 110 w/Haban 420W sickle mower,1972 110,​1997 LX277 w/mower and blower,43C center blade

  9. #48
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    Display Name: Martincom1
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    I have off-peak electric storage heat and an overhead natural gas unit heater. The garage is a 28 x 70 attached. As it was attached, that necessitated minimum 5' frost footings. We insulated the inside of the frost footings the full 5' depth with 2" foam. We then back filled up to 16' below final grade. Followed with laying out the heating cables (4*30 amp circuits) and back filled the remaining 16" over the cables. We ran short on fill and, of course, the excavator left the garage for last. I told home it had to be clean fill, because of the heating cables. He is an arrogant ass and doesn't follow instructions. He brought in fill that was full of debris from another job. So we had to take it back out again. By then, it was the beginning of November and things were starting to freeze---and I couldn't get anything done during deer hunting season. So we couldn't plow in the heating cables. I did get the cables and the backfill done, but it became too cold to pour the garage floor. So it had to wait until spring. That excavator cost me a lot of extra expense and grief that wasn't just limited to the garage..


    Anyway, we ran the water pump for a week or better to settle the backfill and increase the moisture content, which in turn, increases the thermal conductivity and storage capacity. The heating cables warm the earth beneath the garage floor slab. Having the frost footings insulated to the 5' depth allows for quite a bit of thermal storage capacity. The heating cables are powered from "Off-Peak" which means they are only energized from 11:00PM to 7:00AM. It is metered separately. The Off-peak rate is about 30% of the general service rate, so it is quite a savings.

    I usually keep the garage at 50F as I'm not out there on a daily basis. That is where the natural gas unit heater comes into play. When I go out to work in the shop, I bump it up to 62F, which is what is comfortable for me when working out in the shop. It only takes the unit heater 10 minutes or so to bring the temp from 50F to 62F.

    Before I had the unit heater installed, when I was still constructing the home, I bumped the storage heat from 50F to 60F so I could spray polyurethane on interior doors & base. This was in January. It took two weeks to bring the temp up to 60F!

    Even having the floors at 50F makes a world of difference for me. My feet perspire year around and usually by late morning my socks are damp. My business location was an on-grade slab floor. The cold just conducted from the outside to the interior floor. It would be 68F at chest height, but the floor would be around 40F. By noon my feet were freezing and I was plain miserable. Changing socks only brought short term relief. I put up with that for 30+ years. I have no issue with cold feet when working in my home workshop.

    The other plus is the floors dry off quickly when the vehicles thaw out every night.

    We also heat our hot water on the off-peak as well as run the lawn irrigation pump for it.

    The other big plus with having the footings insulated down 5' is that is it tends to maintain the floor at earth temperature, around 50F, in the summer months. So everyone thinks my shop is air conditioned. I pull my car out of the garage on a hot, muggy, August day and it sweats like a Coke bottle!

    We bought a foreclosure for our other home. The garage is 28 x 28 attached. As it was already constructed, the storage heat wasn't an option. The garage walls were insulated and the entire garage was sheetrocked, but not taped. I added a feed for a 90 amp feeder panel in the garage, then taped and painted the garage. Installed a 4" Type B chimney through the roof and installed an overhead LP unit heater. I then insulated the ceiling. We don't heat that garage unless I'm going to be do something out there, but even when the outdoor temp is colder than -20F, the garage stays in the 30s. It doesn't take the unit heater long to bring up the temp, but as everything, including the floor is in the 30s, it cycles frequently for the first day when attempting to bring it up to 62F.

    My bride put up a stink about what I spent to have the garage taped and the cost of the paint (I'm not a drywall taper and don' want to be---I have a brother for that, but he was too far away for this job.) However, that diminished to nothing this winter as it was a giant leap in temp having the ceiling insulated. As far as the taping and paint, if you don't do it from the outset, you never will. Bare drywall can't be cleaned, short of brushing it off with a broom.
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