Rear tires for snowblowing
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Thread: Rear tires for snowblowing

  1. #1
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    Display Name: Graham

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    Rear tires for snowblowing

    I'm not sure if this is the right forum or not, but I figured this applies to more than just the specific model tech forums.

    I'm going to be using my 300 for snow removal this winter, currently i have some very old but serviceable turf tires on the back, with wheel weights and chains.

    I have a set of used ATV tires that would fit the rims sitting in the barn, i was thinking they might work better because i could air them down, its going to be a good 3-4 hour job (I do have an extra set of rims, so thats good) swapping it all around.

    I'm not sure if its worth the time and hassle. Are the turf tires with chains going to cut it when the white stuff really starts piling up? Anyone running ATV tires? Is there something else that is the bees knees for snow and ice traction?

    I was also looking at some ZTR tires that my neighbor has on his machine, they almost look like car snow tires, anyone run anything like that?

    I have lugged Ag tires on my ford tractor and they don't do anything on snow, might even be worse than slicks.


    We had 100+ inches up here in northern wisconsin last year so its definitely worth spending a little time and money to get this rig dialed in.

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    Display Name: Bob Meyer

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    Graham, When pushing snow, you need as much weight on the rear as the tractor will stand...for traction. It's a whole different ball game when blowing snow. If you have ice underneath, you're probably gonna need chains or studs if you've got hills. No ice, chains are OK, just a bumpy ride!

    I blew/threw snow with my 314 & 49 for nearly 35 years...sometimes 2", sometimes 18", and a few times 24"+... I had double wheel weights, chains, fluid filled turf tires, and 6 suitcase weights. Never got stuck...spun a few times, but got out of it! Ground speed is the key. You're blowing the snow out of your way, not pushing it! Let your blower do it's job..it's NOT a blade. Bob
    '80 317 w/18hp B&S and divert valve for rear hydraulics, 3 pt hitch, 5' york rake
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    Thanks for chiming in Bob, so with the chains on there the tires don't really matter?

    I have the wheel weights- that's how it was setup when i bought it and the PO was blowing snow.

    I'm in the process of building my own little sleeve hitch using an off the shelf class 3 receiver tube and the lift bar for the rear tiller. The idea would be to kind of make it a combo weight bar kinda thing although i haven't worked out the details quite yet. My old lawn tractor i welded a receiver hitch on it and used it with the hitch basket carrier and some cinder blocks to add weight, looked dumb but worked really good because you are hanging the weight so far off the rear.

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    Plowing snow or Blowing the snow?
    What is the surface you are on most for this?

    the Turfs with chains and weights will help the most.

    what type of ATV tires are these just stock atv tires?
    What chains are your running 2 link or 4 link?
    Just twisted Link or does it have V bars on them as well?

    I plow with a ATV and I swap out my summer oversized mud/swap tires for worn down stock tires with chains and stock tires with chains will out push the mud/swap tires by %30 give or take.

    I rather just swap tires then hassle with putting chains on/off each year. maybe you want to go that route put the chains on the ATV tires on your spare rims and just swap the tires each year.
    I know before I put the tires on this year did a quick look over the chains and tighten them up where needed and its super easy to due with the tire up on table where you can work at it easy vs being on the machine trying to make things tight.

    just my thoughts.

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    some pics of my atv and chains
    single tire then out on the service station I built for ATV's and Garden tractors and then all chained up with my salt weight box.

    IMG_0138.jpgIMG_0139.jpgIMG_0141.jpg

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    Graham, My feelings are with chains, tire type/pattern really doesn't matter. As tire rotates and chain contacts the ground, the tire is on top of the chain, so type/pattern doesn't do a thing. For the short time the tread contacts, weight will be your major help. Save yourself the time & work of swapping tires, run turfs, chains and weight. Again, MY opinion and what has worked for me. Bob
    '80 317 w/18hp B&S and divert valve for rear hydraulics, 3 pt hitch, 5' york rake
    '82 314 w/rear PTO for tiller
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    Mod 48 deck & Mod 462 TracVac

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    rwmeyer, I agree with ya,

    Im just of the thought its is easier to swap to a different tire and rim with chain already on it than to fight/hassle to get the chain on the tire that is on the machine.

    if you have wheel weights already on the garden tractor that makes the rim/tire swap maybe not the appeasing idea like I due for my ATV.

  10. #8
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    Yeah i'm blowing the snow so i don't need gobs of traction. I have the '49' blower mounted and got that dialed in two weeks ago.

    Last year was a wakeup call for me, broke all the records, my little ford 860 with loader got us through it but it was a 3-4 hour chore each time it snowed more than 8" which was just about twice a week for an entire month. My neighbor has a brand new honda Pioneer UTV and i had to dig him out a couple times.

    I have some take-off stock ATV tires that were on the curb, they have pretty good tread left, my thinking was that they would flex down a bit better than the turf tires. I'll probably fit the chains on the turfs for now and see how it goes.

    I did learn a good lesson last year, blowing is better than pushing, and dual rear brakes will do wonders in limited traction. First thing this spring i bought the 300 for this exact reason. Tts been a great investment in the spring and fall with the tiller, summer cutting grass, fall with the powerflow bagger, and she'll get use right through winter.

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    Another trick for steering, rather than brakes, is lift the blower, just a tad. This puts the weight back onto the front wheels. Bob
    '80 317 w/18hp B&S and divert valve for rear hydraulics, 3 pt hitch, 5' york rake
    '82 314 w/rear PTO for tiller
    33 tiller
    49 thrower
    54 4 way blade
    Mod 48 deck & Mod 462 TracVac

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    Display Name: Jake M

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    Turf tires with chains are really quite good in the snow. V-bars or other "ice technology" being an excellent feature if you need it, depending on of your driveway or other cleared areas can handle it.

    Big knobby treads are much less useful in the snow. They just don't work the way they do in dirt or mud. In short, oversimplified terms, if the snow is heavy or dense enough to give you anything to "pull" against, then for all intents and purposes it's ice, so you can't make a footprint.

    Airing down tires for traction is not so much a "traction" thing, as it is a "flotation" thing. If you're in a muddy field, those might be one and the same. If you're on snow, more surface area is not more traction, it's a toboggan. You don't want that.

    I'm guessing that the tires on your neighbors Zero turn are probably an HDAP type tire. There's several. That's Google fodder, I don't have any experience. The internet really seems to like them, and it appears to me that they would support tire chains well, as opposed to "lug" tires which tend to swallow the chains and render them useless.

    I have a set of tires that are worn to genuine slicks. They work in the snow just about the same as turf tires. Any size, any flavor, any state of wear. I can assure you that ag tires are light years better than that. They are still half a universe away from being much use in the snow. Although, if you happen to have a set of turf tires (or any tires) that are worn to bologna skins... Chain 'em up, they'll work as good as any chained turf tire.


    What you really need to do much of any work in the snow is weight. Personal preference, for plowing/snowblowering, I like weight hanging off the back, versus wheel weights and/or loaded tires. There are drawbacks to that approach, but benefits also. Pound for pound, it makes the back heavier and the front lighter. Making the back heavier (any way you can) is always beneficial in the snow and on ice.

    As mentioned, if you're snowblowing, you shouldn't be pushing all that hard anyhow. Where you REALLY need the weight (and the biggest reason I like weight way out back), is when you pick it up to turn around. Those buggers are heavy, and greatly increase the "drag" on the front of the tractor, and to a big degree, they lighten the back of the tractor when you pick them up. That's when you're more likely to get stuck is when you need to turn around, but can't. I mean, you can get buried anywhere if you try, but if you're trying not to get stuck, that's when you're going to do it.

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