140 -K321AS head gasket replacement
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Thread: 140 -K321AS head gasket replacement

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    140 -K321AS head gasket replacement

    Replacing head gasket on my 140. As you can see it needs it in 1st picture. Decarboned head and block. By the 010 I assume it's been bored out. Cylinder looks good and so do valve seats. I am going to chase out the thread holes and clean up bolts. Should I pull the one head stud or leave it?
    John J.

    '67 112
    '69 112H-project waiting to happen
    '72 110 - daily worker w/ 39 deck, 43 blade, 37A blower
    '73 140 H3 w/ deck
    bunch of off color GTs also

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    Ok...something weird. Cleaning out bolt holes in block and found this. It is #7 bolt on the picture. I don't think it supposed to be there. I never saw an Allen set screw in a block before.
    John J.

    '67 112
    '69 112H-project waiting to happen
    '72 110 - daily worker w/ 39 deck, 43 blade, 37A blower
    '73 140 H3 w/ deck
    bunch of off color GTs also

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    I would leave the stud.

    You are going to flatten the head, yes?

    That allen head is strange. How deep are the threads up to it?

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    Quote Originally Posted by cliffh View Post
    I would leave the stud.

    You are going to flatten the head, yes?

    That allen head is strange. How deep are the threads up to it?
    Ok will leave stud. When I took the head off that bolt had two washers on it. Didn't think about it at the time but that was probably why. I got PB blaster soaking there over night. Gonna try to get it out tomorrow. The head checked out ok on flat glass with feeler gauge but am going to run over Emery cloth/sand paper anyway. What grit do you think would be good? 800? Or finer?
    John J.

    '67 112
    '69 112H-project waiting to happen
    '72 110 - daily worker w/ 39 deck, 43 blade, 37A blower
    '73 140 H3 w/ deck
    bunch of off color GTs also

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    The allen set screw in the bottom of the #7 head bolt is a common fix for a common issue.
    Your engine's been bored .010", so it must have had a period of burning oil.
    When an engine starts burning oil, a whole bunch of stuff changes (heat cycles, carbon, etc.), which essentially locks the bolt in place. When you try to remove the #7 bolt, it snaps off in the block. They need to be drilled out, and a lot of the time, someone does an oopsie and drills all the way through into the exhaust port.
    It's pretty much a guarantee that an oil burner will break #7.
    The allen set screw is most likely to keep carbon off the bolt threads.
    1982 John deere 317, powered by Kohler Magnum 18
    1969 John deere 140 "One eyed Larry", powered by K241, H2 hydraulics
    1963 Burns B-60, Serial 1328

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mudrig150 View Post
    The allen set screw in the bottom of the #7 head bolt is a common fix for a common issue.
    Your engine's been bored .010", so it must have had a period of burning oil.
    When an engine starts burning oil, a whole bunch of stuff changes (heat cycles, carbon, etc.), which essentially locks the bolt in place. When you try to remove the #7 bolt, it snaps off in the block. They need to be drilled out, and a lot of the time, someone does an oopsie and drills all the way through into the exhaust port.
    It's pretty much a guarantee that an oil burner will break #7.
    The allen set screw is most likely to keep carbon off the bolt threads.
    Thanks.
    I was thinking it might have something to do with the exhaust. When I was looking a little closer last night after posting the question, I saw the bolt was almost in line with the exhaust outlet.
    I may try to get it out to see if you're correct (just curious) and put it back if so.
    I'm just wondering if keeping second washer will allow the bolt to be torqued correctly or will it still bottom out on allen screw?. Would I be better trimming the end of bolt off?
    John J.

    '67 112
    '69 112H-project waiting to happen
    '72 110 - daily worker w/ 39 deck, 43 blade, 37A blower
    '73 140 H3 w/ deck
    bunch of off color GTs also

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    Quote Originally Posted by lt230s View Post
    Thanks.
    I was thinking it might have something to do with the exhaust. When I was looking a little closer last night after posting the question, I saw the bolt was almost in line with the exhaust outlet.
    I may try to get it out to see if you're correct (just curious) and put it back if so.
    I'm just wondering if keeping second washer will allow the bolt to be torqued correctly or will it still bottom out on allen screw?. Would I be better trimming the end of bolt off?
    Should be fine using 2 washers. As long as it holds the head down it should be fine.
    An easy way to see would to be to pull the exhaust and look in the port. Should see either the hole or the plug sticking out.
    1982 John deere 317, powered by Kohler Magnum 18
    1969 John deere 140 "One eyed Larry", powered by K241, H2 hydraulics
    1963 Burns B-60, Serial 1328

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    Quote Originally Posted by lt230s View Post
    Ok will leave stud. When I took the head off that bolt had two washers on it. Didn't think about it at the time but that was probably why. I got PB blaster soaking there over night. Gonna try to get it out tomorrow. The head checked out ok on flat glass with feeler gauge but am going to run over Emery cloth/sand paper anyway. What grit do you think would be good? 800? Or finer?
    On most of the K Kohlers I've worked out, the heads are warped enough that I use a file first, and then 150 sandpaper. The last one (last week) the head gasket looked very much like yours, and the head was seriously warped.

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    Display Name: Bob Meyer

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    John, You may have a few problems! That setscrew may...or SHOULD be... Loctited in place. You'll need heat to remove it. As you heat, watch for a little puff of smoke. This is the Loctite breaking down. When you see this, screw should come right out with almost no effort. Be sure to apply hi temp (red 272) Loctite when re-installing!

    Your concern over the washers is justified! Looking at the pic of the blown head gasket, it looks like it blew near the exhaust valve and setscrew/bolt/washers combo. As a bolt is torqued, it stretches. That particular bolt could have stretched and contacted the top of the set screw. Addition torquing would just twist the bolt with no additional holding power and could very easily result in your blown gasket. I've been out of school too long or I'd be able to calculate how much the bolt will stretch. Lemme see what I can find online.

    Another quick comment is to chamfer the tapped holes on the block...1/32"-1/16" is all you need. When you torque, the threads tend to pull upward and can pull up enough that they contact the head and result in improper torquing...and possibly a blown head gasket! This is standard procedure for engine rebuilds.

    One last comment...and I know this is down the road a piece... is to never-seize your head bolts INCLUDING under the head of the bolt. Without lubricating under the head changes the torque the bolt actually sees...torque wrench reads 45 ft-lbs, bolt sees 40 ft-lbs.

    Keep questioning & posting, Bob
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  13. #10
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    Looks to be blown between #1 and #4. I'd recommend putting the set screw in so that there's like 1/8" of clearance between the bottom of the bolt and the top of the set screw. Give it maybe 2 or 3 turns in.
    1982 John deere 317, powered by Kohler Magnum 18
    1969 John deere 140 "One eyed Larry", powered by K241, H2 hydraulics
    1963 Burns B-60, Serial 1328

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