Putting a turbo on a 332
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Thread: Putting a turbo on a 332

  1. #1
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    Display Name: Marcus 332

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    Putting a turbo on a 332

    What are the advantages and disadvantages of putting a turbo on my little 332. Also Would I need an intercooler?

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    Display Name: Bob Meyer

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    Disadvantages: $$$ and labor.

    Advantages: Looks & sounds "kewler", more power!

    Your going to find you really don't need more power from that Yanmar. Traction will be your issue. My 14 hp Kohler in my 314 never ran out of power with a 49, a 54 blade or a 33 tiller. Lost traction, yes, but never stalled or bogged the engine.

    Just my 2¢, Bob
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    Right on..will it help with cooling in the florida heat and would I need an intercooler?

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    I can't answer that with any facts or experience, but I'm thinking a turbo basically puts more fuel into the engine. More fuel equals more heat. With that, I would surmise you'd need an intercooler.

    Are you experiencing overheating problems now? If so, just the light on the dash or blowing out overflow tube. Could be a multitude of issues: bad sensor, bad water pump, clogged radiator, bad thermostat, bad radiator cap.

    If your looking to install a turbo to cool your engine, I (personally) don't think it will help...with or without additional cooler. Bob
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    No overheating issues just entertaining the idea of a turbo

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    If this is something you want to do, do it! If it doesn't work out for whatever reason, you can always take it all off. Go for it! Bob
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    Mod 48 deck & Mod 462 TracVac

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    Display Name: Doug Cartwright

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    The advantage is a couple horsepower and lb ft torque under load at high rpm. The disadvantage,as stated is the time and money needed to put the turbo on will likely never be returned in work performed. I did this last winter and found I could push through a sidewalk plowing, that I couldn't without the turbo. What did that save me, about 30 seconds a run. I pulled the turbo this spring ,as it was getting a bit loose and was putting a bit of oil into the intake tube. (chinese turbo)
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    The turbo will only put more air in the cylinder.
    To take advantage of that available air, the injection pump would need to be recalibrated.
    That recalibration would be determined by the pop off valve. The pop off valve limits the boost pressure at a certain level.

    Just adding a turbo and not recalibrating the injection pump is a recipe for disaster. To much air, not enough fuel will multiply the heat in the cylinder many times.
    That heat is what kills a diesel engine. It takes out the rings, scuffs cylinder walls, and melts pistons.
    If you decide to add a turbo, get a pyrometer.
    Put it in the exhaust manifold before the turbo.

    Also, the recalibration of the injection pump is pretty much a wag, expect to do it at least twice.

    Wag = wild ass guess.
    Good luck.

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    Quote Originally Posted by doug_cartwright View Post
    The advantage is a couple horsepower and lb ft torque under load at high rpm. The disadvantage,as stated is the time and money needed to put the turbo on will likely never be returned in work performed. I did this last winter and found I could push through a sidewalk plowing, that I couldn't without the turbo. What did that save me, about 30 seconds a run. I pulled the turbo this spring ,as it was getting a bit loose and was putting a bit of oil into the intake tube. (chinese turbo)
    It sounds like heat did the damage.
    Do these little diesels have oil coolers on them?

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    Display Name: Doug Cartwright

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    Squirrel, these little chinese turbos are a journal bearing design. I ran a piro guage from the start. I never turned up the fuel or worked it hard/long enough to build excessive heat. I would also idle it down enough time before shutting it down. Heat was not the problem. As far as what you said about turning up the fuel to match the air,that may be sound advice for a gas engine,but these diesels are load-regulated. The more load you add,the more fuel the govener will add to maintain the set RPM. Diesels LOVE air! It is the addition of fuel that causes heat(and boost). My 332 would only build 2-3 lbs boost under heavy load,not nearly enough to engage the wastegate. I have been driving and working on my own turbo diesel trucks for adout 10 years and have learned a thing or two in that time. There is always more to learn ...I can rebuild this little turbo for under $100, it's just a matter of prioritys.

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