Starting my very first restoration! Advice VERY welcome.
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Thread: Starting my very first restoration! Advice VERY welcome.

  1. #1
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    Display Name: Riskinator

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    Cool Starting my very first restoration! Advice VERY welcome.

    Hello,

    Well I decided to try to turn my parts tractor I bought at an auction into a project for restoration. I have a couple of other round fenders in the pipeline (working with an outstanding member on this site to buy another one so I can find how the parts are supposed to go back on!) so in the meantime thought I'd start tearing apart the 1966H and see how far I can get. I have an engine in the works for it. Missing a few other pieces but it's mostly there. I have no idea if the transaxle works well, if the hydraulics work, etc. Time will tell I guess.

    Thought I'd share/ask a few things:

    - While waiting I decided to build a workbench that I can use for pounding on parts when needed. Ended up getting a bit carried away with the oak top and JD paint!

    - If any of you have any advice to a newbie in his first rebuild (I want a high quality end product) please chime in. Sentences like "If I had to do my first rebuild again I'd certainly do......xxxxxxx!" or "I learned it's really important to do .....xxxxxx" Any answers that fills in the sentence is most welcome!!

    Please wish me luck and I hope you don't mind the forthcoming stupid questions over the months to come!!!

    Thought I'd attach a few photos to illustrate what a mess my tractor is and how clean my workbench is. Over time I hope those will reverse!!
    Attached Images Attached Images
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    Starting my first restoration project! All advice is welcome!!


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    Display Name: KnottyRope
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    I think you need some outlets near that bench
    1st 69 140 H3 with 49 thrower, wheel weights tri ribs, Firestone Turfs and can borrow my dads attachments
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    84 420 with turfs, chains, 46 thrower, wheel weights and rear weight bracket - my winter warrior
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    Can't see them due to that railing, but there are some power bars lurking out of sight and can be moved to the sides. Lots of power outlets.
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    Starting my first restoration project! All advice is welcome!!


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  7. #4
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    Display Name: Grant Baker
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    Me,if I were to start on one again(which I have),don't use rattle can paint. It chips easy,as it doesn't really have any hardener in it.

    The bench looks great,but as Knotty says,it needs some outlets. Sand blast everything,or what ever media you have.A sand blast cabinet is an asset as is a parts washer,bigger parts find a place for them to be done.And always take your wallet with you,it is an expensive endeavour

    Good luck,and keep the pics coming

    Grant
    ,1966 60 parts tractor,1968 60 w/mower,1968 110 side tag w/ 43 snow blade, 1968 110 w/1974 80 cart,1968 112 w/mower,1969 110,​1999 LX277 w/mower and blower.43C center blade,Brinly sleeve hitch plow,Brinly disc,Brinly cultivator

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    Also a high capacity compressor,for painting and tools,run 3/8's couplers,not 1/4" .For painting,you need the volume of air to paint correctly,and to run the sand blaster
    ,1966 60 parts tractor,1968 60 w/mower,1968 110 side tag w/ 43 snow blade, 1968 110 w/1974 80 cart,1968 112 w/mower,1969 110,​1999 LX277 w/mower and blower.43C center blade,Brinly sleeve hitch plow,Brinly disc,Brinly cultivator

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    Display Name: Rydplrs

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    Don't forget a big compressor for blasting and painting. I have about 3k into garage upgrades and equipment. I'm hoping to get back to work on it either next month, or spring time. My garage heat is limited still, so no painting if I can't keep it above freezing for 24 hours.

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    Display Name: Tom Ingels

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    Some things that might help. Pictures, lots of them, close ups when possible, and take them before removing parts. You might be surprised how easy it is to put stuff back wrong. Of course there may be some things already changed from the original way it came from the factory.

    Get a box of zip lock bags and a black marker. Put each small part in a bag with its hardware. Clean things one bag at a time so things don't get mixed.

    On one of mine I kept a log of the parts as they were removed so they could be put back in reverse order. This is harder than you might think. Easy to forget to write something down, then find you have to remove a freshly painted part that makes it difficult or impossible to install the next part you pick up! BTDT

    Label every wiring connection with masking tape, write anything important on the tape.

    We'll think of some more things, but the main thing is to not make a JOB out of it. Take your time and enjoy the process. When you run into a frustration, step back, clean some more parts, think it through, and things will work out.

    Best to have a service manual and a parts book close at hand, too.

    tommyhawk

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    Display Name: Colton DeBower

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    Buy a new wiring harness, label bags with bolts, if your going to do it don't go half way do it all engine rebuild trans rebuild the whole dang thing. Print off a copy of the service manual to keep on the bench at all times.

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    Riskinator (09-22-2015)

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    Thanks to everyone for the advice.

    I have a list of shop tools to buy. Just need to space it out a bit. Compressor is the first large purchase and I'll get a pretty good one. In our city I found a "do it yourself" sand blasting place. They provide an industrial quality setup and charge by the hour pro-rated. I'll take all the big stuff there and figure I can get it all done in an hour. They come home and prime everything (weather dependent). If the winter falls before I get this much done then maybe I'll take some of the winter and open up all the mechanicals.

    I'm a bit reluctant to open up the transmission. That seems like quite a daunting step. Anyone comment on doing that their first time?
    __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ ________________________________________
    Starting my first restoration project! All advice is welcome!!


  17. #10
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    What fantastic advice. I tend to get too focused and burn out on things so I'll heed your words!


    Quote Originally Posted by tommyhawk View Post
    Some things that might help. Pictures, lots of them, close ups when possible, and take them before removing parts. You might be surprised how easy it is to put stuff back wrong. Of course there m

    We'll think of some more things, but the main thing is to not make a JOB out of it. Take your time and enjoy the process. When you run into a frustration, step back, clean some more parts, think it through, and things will work out.


    tommyhawk
    __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ ________________________________________
    Starting my first restoration project! All advice is welcome!!


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