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Does anyone know of a good thread on WFM that details a 140 deck restoration project? I'm looking for hints and pictures. My deck is 48" for what its worth. Thanks.

Ryan
 

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Ryan, I'm restoring my 48 Rotary Mower right now, I've done some searches here and came up with a lot of very useful info pertaining to it. I still haven't gotten around to getting a manual for this deck which would be very useful.

I found that replacing the spindle bearings are pretty straight forward...the outer spindles that is, the center drive spindle is going to need some heat I think, but I think I'll get it as others did. Watch out this pulley is easy to bend (mutilate).

First I had to split the spindle mounting nuts (9 total) with a sharp chisel (rusted). I have a grinder and about after 1 or 2 nuts I sharpened and dipped the chisel in water to keep the temper. A couple medium flat screwdrivers removed the outer bearing retaining ring. I left the center retaining ring in place. After removing the outer retaining spring I punched that bearing out with a long punch, a drift punch I think it's called, moving the punch after each tap, like installing a wheel on a car. Then I used 1-3/4 and below sockets and mallet to remove the other bearing (and re installation) using a wood jig. The area around the center spacer was filled with grease, I did the same, I also brushed Anti-Seize around the outer circumference of the bearings and also the inside of the pulley and the shaft keys after truing them up with a fine file. I made a wood jig out of 2x6 after reading Andre Blanchet's post, and the Anti-Seize from Dan Waletzko's.

The two posts that served me well were 77945 and 69050. I looked at a bunch though from searching and have gained a lot of good info. Paint is another good search to do, lots of info on that.

One thing I didn't find is what the torque is for the spindle pulley nuts.

Hope this helps, good luck on it. Eric

(Message edited by Eric300 on April 28, 2006)
 

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Eric - I think the torque on those nuts is 120 ft lbs. I found it in my mower deck manual (which I don't have with me right now). I have a #47 deck but the spindles and torque specs should be the same...

Do you have any pics that you can post of the jigs you made?
 

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I just finished doing my #47. A Sawzall does a great job on the rusted spindle mounting nuts. I ended up reinstalling the pulley nuts with a big pipe wrench on the blade end (it left no marks!) and a 3/4" drive ratchet on the nut. I pulled them up pretty tight but didn't torque them. I don't believe it will be a problem since mine had lock nuts on it.
 

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John, that 120 ft lbs sounds like a good number thank you!
In the lower right area of the picture is the jig, made it a little big but it worked fine for the outer spindles, going to take the center one in tomorrow hopefully I can find a place to take it off with a press and save me some heartache.



I read your restoration thread:
http://www.wfmachines.com/discus/messages/17/90409.html for your 47 and and was impressed. I ordered some John Deere Graphite Lubricant which replaced Slip Plate I guess. The brush on Bed Liner sounded like a good idea, if the graphite doesn't hold I'll try the liner. Do you still have that deck, have you heard anything about the bed-liner performance?

I welded the cracks and a rust through at the lower front of the center spindle mounting area, and filled some thin spots, notably where the idler spring rubbed on the deck. A new arm, Idler and bushing fixed that. I'll fill the rest of the pitting with All-Metal filler. I don't have access to a blaster but got it pretty good with a 4 inch Makita and .20 wire brush. I brushed on some Jasco rust converter tonight.

I was mainly going to just replace the bearings and repaint it. As usual the more I got into the job, the more I saw that needed fixin. Now I'm going to clean up the spindles like they should be and I should of done from the start, might as well :)

(Message edited by Eric300 on April 29, 2006)
 

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Eric - Looks like that deck's going to be good as new and looking the same way when you're done!

I went back and double checked my manual and the 120 Ft lbs is the JD spec:



Unfortunately, I did not get to test that particular deck out because I found another, newer deck that I'm restoring in it's place. On the new deck I tried using 2 coats of POR-15 with another 2 coats of "Slide Coat" on top of it. This one will see action this year so I'll be able to report how it holds out. I'll just have to buy another 200 series tractor to put that other deck on


Glad that thread was able to help you out. Thank you for posting a shot of that jig you made

There's another recent thread that towards the end, talks about replacing the idler arm bolt with a 2" 10MM metric shoulder bolt for a tighter fit in the bushing. I'll find it and post it for you...

Great job!
 

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John – Thanks for posting that diagram! Item (B) says they used multi purpose grease there, that's what I wound up doing when I put them back together (though I'm going to take them back apart to wire brush and repaint them like you did, looked good).

When I originally got the pulley's off and before I removed the retaining ring and bottom bearing I had to dig out some type of compound that encased the bearing and retainer and was flush with the end of the housing. This compound was also in the lower end of the spindle shaft channel that seats over the housing when installed.
I don't know what it is, I'd like to replace it as I think it was to keep water out.

I guess I'll ask the dealer when I pick up the new center spindle shaft that I hit too hard with the nut and screwed up the threads trying to get the pulley off without screwing up the shaft ...didn't work
..I'll have them pull the pulley off too when I go to pick up the parts next week. They also have Slip Plate so I'll get that.

I plan on putting silicone gasket maker between the spindles and deck when I install them to keep moisture from getting trapped there.
 

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Cole - I'm glad you mentioned adding the grease fittings, it gave me the nudge I needed thanks! I tried to find that diagram that Bob Meyer made a while back but wasn't successful, I think he may have removed it for some reason, I have a copy of it but that computer is down at the moment and I haven't messed with it yet. I know others have done it and found some threads on it.

I have been going back and forth whether to add the zerk fittings because from what I've read the bearings should last 10 years or so. Who knows how old these are, I think they've been replaced at least once before though by the tell tale miscolored paint also underneath the pulleys and the different spindle housing.

Some how I often wind up doing things the hard way like starting things over because I know later on I'll kick myself for not doing this in the first place.
So I just tore them back apart and added the zerk's, keeping fresh grease in there has to be a good thing. Pictures coming up.
 

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I installed 1 fitting per spindle, accessed from the top (easy and cleaner) side of the deck.


1.) I used a 1/8” (3.175mm) drill for a pilot, a .209” (5.31mm) for the tap because I didn't get a #3 or .213” (5.41mm) bit. The .209” I had worked fine.

2.) I drilled the 1/8” through. Angled so that it would come out between the center spring clip and the bottom side of the top bearing, that space made by the spacer is normally filled with grease.

3.) I used the .209” and went about 3/8” (9.525mm) deep.

4.) Tapped with a ¼-28 bottoming tap. Slowly turning only about ¼ to ½ turn and backing off to clean the threads, I'd go a few turns and back it out all the way to clean the hole and tap as to maintain good threads, the metal debris can make them sloppy.

I used canned air to blow everything out. I have a compressor but these are so handy.

(Message edited by Eric300 on May 01, 2006)
 

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This one I almost came out too high.

I am closer to the bottom of the top bearing than I'd like but it has plenty of clearance.

The bearings are about 5/8” (15.87mm) thick and I had more between the hole and top of the housing. The top bearing sticks up abit too. I deburred the hole with a jewlers file, I made sure it was nice and smooth.

Cleaning out the garage so I can access the bench and it's vise so I can get some good work done is on the list for this summer, way over due for a arranging and dump run.

(Message edited by Eric300 on April 30, 2006)
 

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I used an angled zerk on the housing I had to file for ensured good access with the grease gun.


I carefully used a scratch-awl/scribe on the outer edge of one side of each bearing pressing it through the softer rubber seal and prying it out, it came right out.



(Message edited by Eric300 on April 30, 2006)
 

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I wound up taking out the center retaining clips out to make sure I didn't leave any baddies behind.

They weren't that bad to take out, I re-installed them first after I washed/scrubbed and blew them out.

I installed new JD retainer spring clips on the bottom side, man those are nice. They're cut in a bit more so you can get a better grip on them. I had bought some other 1-1/4 (31.75mm) inner spring clips with the holes that require special pliers but I think these are better. To each his own, those I'm sure are nice other times.

The older ones I left on the inside were fine to remove and re-install there. 2 medium flat screw drivers (not special pliers) worked good, I mainly used one newer one (sharp though) that grabbed better and and older one that was rounded and gentler on the metal. I did use a bigger older one too though some in all.

I put on a bit of the All-Metal filler, it's the first time I've used it, haven't done much body work. I just checked it and it seems to have hardened alright, I'll find out tomorrow when I start sanding it.

Eric

(Message edited by Eric300 on May 01, 2006)

(Message edited by Eric300 on May 01, 2006)
 

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I meant to point out, but it got lost in the shuffle, that the odd angled nub/protrusion in the mounting flange (that is illustrated in the manual) is a perfect spot for a grease fitting, and I think that's what it was for.

It didn't look like it to me exactly at first, but after I drilled it, it looked like if you centered the drilled 90 degrees perpendicular or maintaining a right angle to that special flat area would be perfect.

Eric
 

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I need to clarify the spring clip size I posted above (on Sunday, April 30, 2006 - 11:31 pm) from 1-1/4” (oops_) to the correct bearing retainer clip size of 1-3/4” (44.45mm) if you wanted to get the regular ones for pliers.

I also want to add that if I had more of these spring clips to do I'd probably invest in the new style pliers, there's pliers for inside, outside, a set for straight on like for the center clip, maybe more. For now just a couple screw drivers is fine for me at the moment.

I'm sanding my first application of All Metal filler I mixed and put the deck last night. It sands pretty good, not so easy that it might not hold up but also hard enough to sand that it should hold up ok, the guy at NAPA said the old car restorers like it. As usual, time will tell when I'm done. I'll spread some more on today and try and keep the ridges down to a more even minimum than I did last night. I've still got to prep the gauge wheel hanger and lift straps.
 

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I was held up trying to get a new pulley after major failure attempting to press the main drive pulley/ jack sheave off. It didn't budge off the shaft under 10 tons pressure setting on it for a half hour.

I realized somebody else here went through this too and mentioned the page on jdparts for the earlier 41-48 Rotary Mower jack sheave (drive pulley) is confusing. To order the whole assy. It actually orders two hub assy's and shaft I think.
The later serial number deck jack sheave assy is much clearer and has the same parts, so I ordered those, was U$90.00 cheaper.
I almost drove 122 miles one way to buy a deck that needed more work than mine did to get back mowing but I'd have to go through it to and I just did it on this one, I like working on this stuff if I'm accomplishing something. I'm not doing this for my health.

I want to post this picture to see how the resolution at 400x300 Pixels turns out.

I took that POR15/JSQ Metal-Ready or whatever it is back after trying a small amount, didn't like it.

I like Jasco Prep and Primer (no affiliation I'm strictly an amateur) and was almost out and decided to try the Metal-Ready because the paint is supposed to be pretty good. The Jasco chemically changes the rust composition and I think the Metal-Ready encapsulates it, which I guess works good too but with Jasco I can see it working and trust it. and it's 3 times cheaper.
 

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One thing to keep in mind with any RUST CONVERTER (the main ingredient is ACID, Phosphoric Acid).
It will wreak havoc, no worse, it'll eat a hole in your concrete garage floor if the bottle tips over and you don't catch it, till you smell something that doesn't seem right and look for it and find it and a pile of powder. I know.

I have a pair of expensive gloves, they're blue and resist a bunch of chemicals. I'd invest in a pair of good chemical gloves, good quality face mask, and a half face respirator for painting, if your your serious about your health. Added expense but for just doing this stuff these things last a long time.

I really like that All Metal. I've never used Bondo but after straightening out the spindle holes by beating on it good with a sledge hammer and chunk of steel right after I had a layer of it on and it staying I like it..
 

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The following pictures are what I took in straightening out the deck.

I was originally just straightening out the dimpled mount holes of the spindles. But soon realized that they needed more work. I have a chunk of 1 inch steel. It is like 6 x 8 inches, a little bigger would be better I think but this is what I found a few years ago to tamp sand for a paver walkway, I didn't make the tamper but this has been quite useful anyways.

Blocks of wood or something to set only the deck spindle mounting areas on. (3 spindles, 3 blocks or 2 blocks plus one shorter block, whichever works and fits under there.).
Set the steel on one, and shim the rest of the blocking so together they're the same height and on a flat surface, level if you want to be technical.

I laid the deck down on my the stacks of wood block and chunk of steel (and ear plugs) and banged away. Leveling the dimples.

Then I set the deck up on it side (it actually balanced on the gage wheel/draft arm hanger brackets)
and used a 4 foot level across the two back spindles, and a 2 foot level between the front and aft outside spindles only using the straight edge. Lay it back down on those blocks to check their levelness. This might be to involved but I think this straightened my deck out pretty well. I did notice the 2 outer spindle mounts were canter up towards the outside. I did consider that with the weight of the spindles and blades in service, that they might need that...I'll find out.

Eric
 

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A handy chunk of 1 inch steel plate. Blocking to match height of spindle mounts.


Used the straight edge of the levels, a straight 2x4 would work just the same.






Holding the straight edge firmly over each spindle and noticing any gap to the other opposite spindles was very revealing.

In combination I trusted the gap dimensions I found between the three for front to back and side to side levelness, laing it down on the leveled blocks also gave avery good indicator.
 
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