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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Or maybe a whole machine rebuild. I've posted about this before at some length, but it seems to be conclusively established that the governor gear in the engine is not functioning as it ought to, and a retired John Deere lawn tractor mechanic has thrown up his hands and said that he was not able to get the governor properly adjusted (from the JD service manual for the 200 series, which I was able to buy and copied the relevant pages for him). He thinks that the governor gear is bad. I've looked around the internet, and it appears that to replace the governor assembly, one must remove the crankshaft and engine, disassemble the engine, and install the three parts inside the engine, re-hook up the linkage to the carburetor and adjust it. Now if one is tearing the engine apart to do that, one might as well do an engine rebuild, which, if one cannot do the work oneself means spending quite a bit of money on the machine.

The current state is as follows: it cranks and runs quite well, unless it gets into tall grass when it is mowing. Then it chokes down and comes close to dying. Pressing the clutch will allow the RPMs to come back up, and it will cut for a couple of feet before trying to die again. On the other hand, it will pull my garden cart without a hiccup, which means that it still has use for me.

Now the question is: would I be a fool to find a mechanic in Northwest Mississippi or in the Memphis area and have the whole motor re-done at whatever cost it takes, or should I consider buying a complete rebuilt motor with governor attached, or should I save my money and put it towards a whole different machine--green, of course, but maybe one more capable of handling a 4 acre lawn than the 210 ever was?

How do I go about looking for a good lawn mower mechanic? I had found one, but he's got a real job now and is no longer in the business.
 

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Before you start tearing into the engine you might want to try opening up your high speed fuel mixture needle 1/2 to a full turn and see if that helps. If your carburetor is running a little on the lean side you can have the same results that you are experiencing. When the governor starts to "hunt" it will open up the butterfly on the carb and try to dump more air/fuel in, if the high speed mixture isn't set right it simply can't dump enough fuel quick enough to get it not to bog down. I have to run mine a tad on the rich side otherwise it will do the same thing yours is doing under heavy load. Give it a try.
 

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You probably should remove the carb and clean it out. Especially the high speed needle, it's a tube actually and make sure all the tiny holes are clean.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You probably should remove the carb and clean it out. Especially the high speed needle, it's a tube actually and make sure all the tiny holes are clean.
A couple of months ago, I had the worn out Walbro carburetor replaced with a Carter 26 (?) type full kit purchased from Isavetractors. A JD dealership did the replacement. They told me that one gasket (the air intake gasket, IIRC) was not included in the complete kit, so they "made one". Since they sent the 210 home several weeks ago, its carb has been adjusted and re-adjusted. I noticed when it came home yesterday, it was backfiring when it was turned off. Since it's a brand new carb and has been wanting to die from the first day it arrived home, it shouldn't be in bad shape as far as clean goes.

What seems to be the next step may be getting a "Theysit Vibration tachometer", which is called for in the Service manual, and using that to reset the carb to specs.
 

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The "Treysit Vibration tachometer" is available on evilbay for $40 with free std shipping. Id go to Harbor Freight and get a magnetic or digital photo sensor tach. Put a piece of tape on engine pulley, point instrument, push button, and read rpm.

You said, "
it shouldn't be in bad shape as far as clean goes." Do you have a fuel filter? Is your fuel tank clean? Is there a screen in the tank...that needs cleaning...?

It may be a carb adjustment or a fuel delivery problem. When you get into high grass and engine starts to slow down, governor opens carb for more fuel. If tubing or filters are clogged, there may not be enough fuel available to the carb. Bob
 

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A couple of months ago, I had the worn out Walbro carburetor replaced with a Carter 26 (?) type full kit purchased from Isavetractors. A JD dealership did the replacement. They told me that one gasket (the air intake gasket, IIRC) was not included in the complete kit, so they "made one". Since they sent the 210 home several weeks ago, its carb has been adjusted and re-adjusted. I noticed when it came home yesterday, it was backfiring when it was turned off. Since it's a brand new carb and has been wanting to die from the first day it arrived home, it shouldn't be in bad shape as far as clean goes.

What seems to be the next step may be getting a "Theysit Vibration tachometer", which is called for in the Service manual, and using that to reset the carb to specs.

When you swapped out the Walbro for the Carter did you get the throttle linkage that goes between the carburetor and the governor arm? I don't think the Walbro Carb to governor arm linkage is the same as the Carter's. If you tried to make the Walbro linkage work that may be your problem?


Hec
 
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