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It looks like that part is obsolete. Digi-Key is a good resource for components like that. There are some other similar sites too.

If you can find a switch with similar mounting holes, dimensions, and cam/actuator/arm, it will probably work. Honeywell customer support may be able to help you cross reference to a modern part.

Assuming you're just replacing bad switches. Before you go through all that trouble, have you checked your switches with a multimeter? Just making sure you're diagnosing the right problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
opened up the switches don't see anything wrong pretty simple point set,put 12 volts to motor and it works the one solenoid just clicks when you push the plunger on the switch asking it to go up ,need to find a way to check solenoids not sure how to check them sure they will be hard to find also most electric stuff is a weak point for me
 

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There were at least two different models of the 200 series electric lift panels.

Does yours have 2 or 4 solenoids? Photos of your panel would also be helpful.

You'll need a 12V batter and multimeter (or a test light) to check the solenoids. Once we know which model solenoids you have, I can tell you where to put the leads.

It's more likely that the solenoids that have failed. Microswitches are rated for many more cycles than yours have endured. Plus, all the high-current stuff happens on the solenoids, not the microswitches.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Green Vehicle Motor vehicle Automotive tire Hood
I think switches are fine also but I bought one at electric supply house today as a spare and ordered a solenoid AM 35906 off E-bay ,lift has worked perfect for years I do need to check solenoids though thanks
 

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If nothing else it does look quite clean.
 

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You have the same model as me. They basically combined 2 solenoids into one. Theory of operation is very simple. The solenoids just control which side of the motor gets Positive (12V) and which gets Negative (0V, common). When you want to go the other direction, the solenoids reverse the connections.

It sounds like you're at a point where you just need to determine which solenoid to replace. Once you have your working part, that should be a simple activity.

There is also a "fuse" in the panel. Which looks nothing like a normal fuse. It's just a piece of metal. I've never blown mine, but you could check. Item #11 on JD parts diagram.

Yours has something that mine does not. I don't immediately recognize the component either. What is the part circled in red in the attached photo?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
That is a point saver I think it was Kirk think there used to be a link on the site somewhere,works great set points once and they last years.I found my manual last night not good with electrical but I have been reading on it not really sure how it knows to shut the motor off at depth stop or return when micro switch is still pushed in
 

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Ok I've heard of the point saver before, but never knew what they looked like. I wanted to make sure it wasn't something added by a DIY-er along the way.

There is a small bracket that goes from the lift arm to the control panel for "position feedback". There should be two microswitches, one fixed to the cam on the control lever and one fixed to the cam on the feedback mechanism. You can hear them click on and off as you move the lever. There are 3 possible states:
  1. When you move the lever toward you, one switch closes, and the solenoids put voltage on the motor to lift.
  2. When you move the lever away from you, the other switch closes, and the solenoids put voltage on the motor to lower (opposite polarity from #1).
  3. When the lift is at the desired position both switches are open, and there is no motion. No voltage applied to the motor.
Nowadays, we would do this with computers and digital sensors, but these old Deeres did it old school 😎

The service manual on wfmfiles also has a diagram explaining the flow of electrical current in the UP and DOWN states.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Kirk has a website the point saver great product almost makes a solid state system no readjusting ,put the micro switches back in tried the solenoid test as book said one just clunks when energized but no 12v light on , the other has 12v on it before I put 12v direct to wire from micro switch, it will power down but not up thinking just one bad so waiting on delivery Thanks for your help
 

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Good luck!

A lot of folks give the electric lift a bad reputation. I think it's mostly because electrons can sometimes be hard to wrangle. I added this option to my 212, and it lifts the 37a snowblower (even packed full of snow) and 31 rear tiller without a struggle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Still waiting on new solenoid tried retesting per manual test light on 1 and 3 one has 12 v all the time the other one not and both just clunk when you apply 12v to #4 control switches, I'm sure it powered deck down but not up and motor works up and down with 12v Font Book Publication Paper Paper product
Rectangle Schematic Font Parallel Engineering
 

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I have a 112 with electric lift. Works great. Also have a electric lift kit I bought to use on ? . To make sure the kit worked ok I had to buy the switch (got it from Deere). I mounted the components to a piece of plywood and it did not work, I found out the solenoid are grounded thru their mounts. After I grounded all the solenoids it works great also.
 

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I had some time to revisit the diagram.

When the solenoid is NOT active, the plunger makes a connection between point 5 and 6. Essentially, this connects 0V (Negative Terminal) to that side of the motor.

When the solenoid is active, the plunger makes a connection between point 1 and 3. Essentially, this connects 12V (Positive Terminal) to that side of the motor.

Remember points 5 and 3 are tied together, so electrically, they're the same point.

The condition you describe leads me to believe both solenoid plungers may be stuck in opposite states. This should also mean that your motor raises or lowers indefinitely, regardless of microswitch states.

When you did the test, did you energize point 4 on both solenoids at the same time or separate? You should ONLY activate ONE solenoid at a time.

Try this:

First, disconnect the motor connection under the tractor. Disconnect the (brown or white depending on side) wire from microswitch at point 4. Connect your light at the negative battery terminal and point 3. At this point the solenoid is inactive, and the light should be OFF.

Leave the microswitch wire disconnected at point 4.

Now, use a jumper to connect point 4 to the positive terminal of the battery. The solenoid should click. At this point the solenoid is active, the light should be ON.

Repeat for the other solenoid and report your findings.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
It was going down under power not up, right now neither just a clunk, think I might take them out and clean all connectors is there a good bench test I could do and check the new one when it arrives out of the tractor? also saw a 12v 5 post solenoid for golf carts for $18.00 that looks the same on Amazon do you think they would be compatible? I will try your other check also Thanks for the help don,t really need it unless I put the blower on but needs fixed
 

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I think your Amazon find could be a good candidate. You would probably have to drill new mounting points in the panel, but electrically something like this should work.

The OEM solenoid connects points 1 - 3 when active and 5 - 6 when inactive. It is also grounded through the frame. If you find one that can do that, you could probably use it.

With non-OEM replacement you also should pay attention to the current/amps rating of the solenoid. Deere never states the value. But I can tell you mine has never blown a 30A glass fuse that I added.

You can also do it with 4x standard ignition solenoids, but that would be a drastic wiring change. Deere did this with the early models.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Ended up the fix was a direct ground to the negative battery cable,I guess after 40 plus years it lost it's ground and cleaning and tightening didn't work so all the old parts still working and now I have a spare solenoid and switch, here is a color diagram showing how it works in Rectangle Schematic Font Parallel Handwriting
 

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Glad you found the issue. It seems like these squirrelly issues with car/tractor/boat electrical systems are almost always caused by a bad ground. And for no good reason either.

It wasn't all for naught - you got to learn more about your electric lift than you ever wanted to. You're an expert now!
 
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