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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am refurbing a 214. Most of the engine mounts are broken loose so I ordered 4 new mounts. How do most people install them? Pop-rivets? Small bolts and nuts? It's too small for a 1/4 so it's like a #10 or something if yiou went with a bolt. That seems like a very small bolt to retain an engine? And it won't be grade 8 or similar. Original looks like pop rivets so I suppose steel pop rivets is probably the way to go. Any idea of the proper size pop rivet?
 

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If you have the engine out you'll have space/access to use rivets...never done that. I use hardened small metric bolts and lock nuts from the local farm/hardware store, because I just lifted the engine up for access to do this, rather than pulling it completely.
 

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Drill completely through the old isolater and frame with a 3/16 drill bit, then use 3/16x1/2 rivets to put in the new ones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I always like to follow up with my experience. I already had the grille and battery tray out and both side tins off. I also had the air cleaner off. I took all 4 engine mount bolts out of the isolators. I did not remove any belts or loosen the actual engine to cradle bolts. I started with the front mounts and drilled the rivets on one mount at a time. Sliding the engine around a bit with a prybar and a using strategically placed wood block, you can get drill and tool access to all rivet locations. The hardest part is getting the rest of the old rivets out. With a combination of drilling with a 3/16 and a punch they will come out. The front ones are not too difficult to rivet. I used an Arrow brand tool. I also have a Marson that I like better but did not have a 3/16 nose for it. I used steel 3/16 x 1/2 pop rivets. Suggest putting both rivets in place before doing 1 or your hole may not exactly line up for the second wasting time. Then I moved to the rear isolators. The left one is not too bad. With the battery tray out the tool can go straight back on the inside one. The right inside proved to be the most difficult of all, because of the steering box and variator linkage you can't go straight back with the tool. I ended up with the handles pointing left. Also couldn't get the nose all the way down on that one due to a bracket so I added some washers between the nose and the rivet, a different tool might have been different. All in all I think I spent an hour and a half even chasing tools a few times. All 4 still looked OK from the top but really bad from the bottom. Glad I did them all and not just the 2 with broken ears. Maybe this will help somebody else.
 

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It was really easy with the motor out, if someone is going to do it I would recommend pulling it.
 

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Me too...the only rivet tool I had wasn't suitable IMO at the time, so I used stainless bolts and lock nuts on the 212 and 216. Well pleased because I didn't pull either engine completely, just raised a little and moved sideways. Mounts are still holding tight 1-4 years later. Bob's yer uncle. Operator choice.
 
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