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Discussion Starter #1
In relation to my dead Kohler 321AQS on my 314 (http://www.wfmachines.com/forums/showthread.php/47177-314-starts-and-runs-fine-then-engine-started-to-die/page6?highlight=314+stalls) I am looking for a repower option.

This options appear to be:
1. Harbor Freight (apparently a Honda 'clone'). Here's a link to an engine, but no kit for a 314. http://www.harborfreight.com/engines-generators/gas-engines/22-hp-670cc-v-twin-horizontal-shaft-gas-engine-epa-61614.html . Would this work for a K321 replacement? I would assume that this isn't just a simple drop in and I would have to get hold of an engine mount also. Who sells those?
2. Briggs Vanguard http://www.smallenginewarehouse.com/356447-JD314-R2.html?sc=17&category=1710197 . Anyone ever ordered from this place (as a kit) and had success?
3. Honda (no link found to a kit or engine model)

I want a reliable engine that is going to last at least 15 years with good maintenance. I need it to start in the cold (kept in barn so gets below freezing in winter) and handle snowblowing. I have farted around enough with the 321 already that I don't need another project other than installing the thing!

Any tips? Thanks
 

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I've toyed with the idea for awhile. My 321 is still running strong, but the SEW Vanguard kit would be the way I'll go when the time comes. The vanguards seem pretty durable.
 

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How much do you want for your 321AQS? Seriously, that K series Kohler, re-bored will last you 30 years for the amount you will use it.
 

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Don't put a harbor freight engine in! What's wrong with the KOHLER that's in it ?
 

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I had fun with my 321 and after a bit of messing around I was able to get It running well

that 321 should last you many years once you find the issue
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the links. I am reviewing the steps necessary to check the kohler bore and then piston rings first. Unfortunately just to check the bore there's $100 in tools! I managed to find a machine shop to bore it out / grind valves / skim head. That would run $200 just for the bore, $70 for head, unsure about valve seats but I could prob do that myself. So by the time I'm done with rebuild I may be $500 in to it.

The B&S repower kit I see on small engine warehouse states that it includes everything. I'm sure there's something missing, but it is probably 95%. The one thing it does mention is that there's no room for an oil filter due to the tight fit. Not sure if that is going to be a performance problem? For $1400 shipped it seems like a deal if I factor in my time. If I can sell the tired kohler for a couple of hundred that would sweeten it, but I may be waiting a while for that.

Still pondering both. Thanks for all the advice and I definitely understand the longevity benefits of a Kohler.

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The Vanguard is a nice engine, but I'd definitely try to fit that oil filter in somewhere if going that route.


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britishrob, I thought in your original thread you said you were not equipped to get the old engine out? How do you plan to do a repower? I gotta believe that is going to take a lot of effort, more than getting the k321 rebuilt.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
britishrob, I thought in your original thread you said you were not equipped to get the old engine out? How do you plan to do a repower? I gotta believe that is going to take a lot of effort, more than getting the k321 rebuilt.
yes, I'm not! I haven't got any means of lifting off an engine.

I am looking to find some tools to measure the bore. I found a few great videos from isavetractors on how to do this, plus hone it and install new rings correctly. Really great videos.

measure bore: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nOEg-iBJgvQ
install rings & piston: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ccRpH-m76Ak
 

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DO NOT invest in tools to measure the bore. Waste of money if you do not plan on using them again often. That is what engine repair/machining shops are for. They have the correct tools and experience to do this. Bring your engine in and pay to have them measure it and tell you what needs to be done. You wouldn't be trying this with your automobile and you need to be just as fussy or maybe more fussy with a small engine. With one cylinder mistakes are often more serious than with multi cylinder engines. If you are interested and nice about learning the shop may allow you to watch what they are doing to satisfy your interest. Also don't in general go for the cheapest as your priority. You generally get what you pay for. I use a guy that builds race car engines and use him at times when the racing business is slow and he is also more reasonable with cost then. He also never lets any engine out of his shop unless it is done correctly. His business depends totally on the reputation of the work he does. Roger
 

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yes, I'm not! I haven't got any means of lifting off an engine.

I am looking to find some tools to measure the bore. I found a few great videos from isavetractors on how to do this, plus hone it and install new rings correctly. Really great videos.

measure bore: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nOEg-iBJgvQ
install rings & piston: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ccRpH-m76Ak
snap gauges, the ones that look like a T are good for this, you measure them with a micrometer. DO NOT BUY CHEAP SNAP GAUGES FROM CHINA! In fact, unless you are boring it your self, let the machine shop do it. They have the required measuring tools. The proper quality snap gauges and micrometer will cost you more than the bore job at the machine shop. Do not buy the cheap Chinese stuff. I am just passing on what I have learned from my machining hobby. I have a Bridgeport Mill which can be used to bore an engine, but this is a job better served with a "jig borer", again a machine that a proper machine shop who does this sort of thing would have. As far as lifting that motor out, head on over to Harbor Freight with a 20% off coupon and pick up an engine hoist. This is one tool that is safe to buy at Harbor Freight.
 

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Not much needed just to remove the engine. Two people can lift it out with not much of a hassle. Heck I was able to lift mine into the tractor by myself (and no I don't lift weights ). Although I couldn't quite remove the engine by myself.

I've seen your pictures of the bore in your other thread. I'd be VERY surprised if you don't have to bore it out. I would not even be surprised if they have to take it out to .020" like they had to on mine. With that being said take the block and crankshaft to the shop and and have them measured so they KNOW what needs to be done.

So for now I wouldn't bother investing in any special measuring tools. The only measuring tool you really need is a feeler gauge for reassembly.
 

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OK thanks folks, a few resounding answers here to not bother with tools and get the thing to the shop! The place I called has come recommended by three people now (Boucher's in Rowley MA) so I guess their work is good. They did ask that I strip it down as much as possible due to a full schedule, which I will do.

Guess I will remove the oil, oil pan, air filter, carb, starter, coil etc.

I'm sure this will lighten the load some and I can bug a neighbor to help lunk it into the back of the car.

When others have done such a tear down how do you organize the parts? If I leave something a few weeks I will forget how it goes back together. Anyone have any good methods?

Thanks for tip to the engine hoist.

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OK thanks folks, a few resounding answers here to not bother with tools and get the thing to the shop! The place I called has come recommended by three people now (Boucher's in Rowley MA) so I guess their work is good. They did ask that I strip it down as much as possible due to a full schedule, which I will do.

Guess I will remove the oil, oil pan, air filter, carb, starter, coil etc.

I'm sure this will lighten the load some and I can bug a neighbor to help lunk it into the back of the car.

When others have done such a tear down how do you organize the parts? If I leave something a few weeks I will forget how it goes back together. Anyone have any good methods?

Thanks for tip to the engine hoist.

Sent from my Passport using Tapatalk
Take tons of pictures. I use ziploc bags and a sharpie to label them. The fewer parts and the more specific the label the better.

Did i mention TONS of pics. From every angle.....they'll be worth it when you go back to put it together in a few months and totally forgot where the heck a part goes.

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Yes pictures will help. Especially when it comes to assembling shrouds and governor components.

A lot of the bolts you remove can be threaded back in where they came from. Like the shroud bolts came be put back in the head and bearing plate, drive hub bolts can be put back in the flywheel, breather cover nut, cam cover bolts, starter mounting bolts, and fuel pump mounting bolts can be put back into the block. Some bolts you'll want to leave off so they don't get in the way. The less loose bolts you have the easier it is to reassemble.

I remember when I had my engine apart and looking at the scattered mess thinking to myself "Well this is gonna be fun! Should have been more patient taking it apart!"

But when reassembly came around it really wasn't that bad
 

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Discussion Starter #17
OK, thanks. I think there's an old camera lying around that I don't mind getting oil all over. Will get some zip lock bags. I watched some k321 youtube videos last night and saw that using ties to keep the gearing all together helps.

To remove the flywheel and crankshaft it looks like I will need a puller (or 2) according to the videos and service manual.

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Yes you will need a puller to remove the flywheel. I have never done a K321 on a 314, but I have pulled one from a 140. On the 140 there is no way of removing the flywheel while it is in the tractor. Not sure about the 314.
 

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British Rob I would also suggest downloading or buying a Kohler K series engine manual. With that book you could put a K series together after never having seen one before. Roger
 
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