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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been progressively replacing the fuel line on a P218, and have now removed the vacuum line from the crankcase to the fuel pump. The hose snapped leaving 3/4" on the crankcase nipple flush with the end of the nipple. The remaining portion is as hard as rock. I worked and worked, and still have a nipple with a very rough surface that looks like it has been brazed (which I certainly doubt, I assume it is VERY hard hose). I do not have enough leverage or a good angle to get any more off. I have tried every conceivable manipulation of the tools I have, and this is the best I can do. The nipple is not threaded to remove it and do a better job, is it? I eventually got the new hose on, but do not know if it will seal. I shall see...

Also, I removed the cowling from the side in front of the oil filter. How do I get the bolt back in the bottom that holds the two cowling pieces together? It is just inside the tractor frame. I did not envision removing the engine to replace this hose, but access is very restricted.
 

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Hi Ed - Wow, when you think something will be a simple job, the gremlins come out of nowhere. I never had to deal with the vacuum hose when I had my 318, so I can't help you on that one. I did, however, have the same issue with the screw and the side cowling. What I did, is started the screw into the tapped hole, with the cowling removed. I then slotted the hole in the cowling out to the edge, so as to open the hole up to the outside world. Then all I had to do was slip the cowling between the engine and the head of the screw, then tighten the screw. For some reason, starting the screw without the cowling was easy where as trying to install the screw along with the cowling was virtually impossible. - Dave
 

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I have been there.The hose is usually held on the nipple by a spring hose clamp. Long needle nose or hemostats will get it. to get the bolt back in, I used a craftsman ratcheting box end wrench. Put the bolt in the wrench and go at it from the front of the engine. When you get it close, put your finger up thru the hole in the side of the frame to sort of push the bolt up into the hole, the start ratcheting it in. It took several tries to get it, but it did go in. Its a real pita.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I got the hose clamp off, but there is probably some baked on hose that is very very tightly stuck to the nipple. After cleaning the best I can, and replacing the hose, it appears to function well enough that the fuel pump works at least as well as ever, on a brief test run.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I wrote too soon. After putting it back together, and running it, I see the fuel pump does NOT pump. Let me ask a different question. What will soften the very old rock-hard residual hose still stuck to the nipple?
 

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Ed,
I had the same Issue on my 318 when I bought it. I just broke down and removed the engine. It was a whole lot easier than trying to manipulate bolts and the likes into the cramped confines. The toughest part was lining up the drive shaft.
Before you get to far along, have you did a vacuum check on the fuel pump?
Good luck.
Chris
 

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Ed, the proper fuel/air mixture burns evenly across the combustion chamber when ignited by the spark plug. A too-lean mixture doesn't burn evenly, instead it explodes creating abnormally high temperature and pressure in the cylinder before the piston has time to start its downward stroke. Secondly, the relatively cool fuel vapor in a proper mixture provides a cooling effect in the cylinder during the intake stroke. Without this cooling the temperature of the cylinder, piston and head can exceed the capability of the cooling system (air or water) to remove excess heat from the engine.
Hope this helps, Stan
 
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