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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 318 that I finished restoring before the winter hit. I decide to use it this winter with my 49 snowblower. I used it about a week ago in our first snow storm in MA, and it worked OK. I definitely need to add the paddle mod to it.

I know people like pictures, so here are a few of the machine (along with my other 318 with a 44 loader on it). It was almost completely rebuilt, including the B43G engine (overbored +.010, lots of new parts in that).

Wheel Tire Automotive tire Toy Hood


Tire Wheel Vehicle Automotive tire Motor vehicle


Tire Wheel Automotive tire Vehicle Motor vehicle


Wheel Tire Land vehicle Vehicle Plant


But back to my main question. After using it this first snowstorm, I noticed a leak from the Hydro transmission. I have a picture of where it is leaking below: (this is not MY transmission, just using it to show the location).

Motor vehicle Wheel Automotive tire Automotive wheel system Gas


After looking at the parts database, it looks like there is a seal in there. Has anyone replace this seal? Can it be done by just taking out the transmission/diff as a unit and pulling out the seal and replacing it? I hope the Transmission doesn't need to be taken apart .

I appreciate the time and help!
Jesse C.
 

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There are two ways to remove this seal without taking the transmission apart. One is by drilling a small hole, about 1/16", in the metal face of the seal, turning a metal screw about half way in, and pulling/prying on the screw. The screw might pull out of the seal, but you can try multiple times.
The other way is using a seal puller like this: 58430 Shaft Type Seal Puller
With this puller it might be possible to pull the seal without taking the transmission out of the tractor. I know I have done this on the other side, but I can't remember if I have done it on the side shown.
 

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1989 318
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This is pretty ingenious! And we thought we had all the tools we needed? Any it still has the screw-adjust feature, cool!
 

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If anyone decides to make one, verify the thread on the adjusting screw, as some are metric and some are SAE.
Tmac, yup. I've had it close to 20 years now and was working in a shop when I made it. Turned the end of the threaded rod in a lath and also the sliding weight. Bob
 

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Nice job on keeping and rebuilding the
Onan
 

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Directed at ?
 

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1989 318
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It looks like it would be good for removing cotter keys or similar retaining pins where you typically have to pull with pliers or lever them out with an assortment of screwdrivers/picks.
 

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Tmac...and others that may be interested!... I think the first time that I used it, and the reason I made it, was to remove a plain ol' electrical box for a receptacle. This was somehow tightly installed in a piece of base molding and I was removing the old knob & tube wire and replacing with BX with a ground wire. I could pry the box so it would stick up about 1/8" above the molding and that was it. I tried vise grips and prying with a screw driver various flat bars, etc., but no luck after probably 2 or 3 hours. It was the weekend, so I went on to other projects. When I got into the shop the following week, I machined the threaded rod and the slide hammer, assembled it when I got home, and gave it a try. I locked it on one side of the box, 3 or for hard slams with the slide and it came up another 1/4" and stopped. I put the puller on the other side of the box, and that side came up about 1/4" and stopped... with the first side going back down! It was just "rocking". A clamped a 2nd vise grip on the side I pulled, and put the puller on the opposite side... and gained another 1/4". Working side to side with vise grips & my puller and I finally got the box out... in about 30-45 minutes! I'm thinking the box was driven into the back of the molding and then the molding installed. I also had to keep a knee against the molding as I was also pulling the molding off!
Since then as Tom mentioned, great for cotter keys, and I've even removed split pins with it. If I can get it to hold, it'll remove whatever it's attached to! Works great for seal too with a sheetrock screw in the seal.
Fortunately, no BIL, and ex-wife could could not be adjusted or motivated without me going to jail for murder 1... but the thought did cross my mind a few times!

As I mentioned earlier, if someone tries to make one, verify the thread and a piece of threaded rod about 18" long from a box store will work. Grind the threads off the last 3/8" of the rod where it screws into the vise grip. This prevents the end from getting burred up and the rod can be removed without destroying the threads. Just make the end look like the end of the original adjusting screw. The slide weight is probably the most troublesome as not all have access to a lath and/or 2" or 3" bar stock. I'd think a 2"x6" pipe nipple with screw on caps would work. Drill caps install 1 cap, mount on rod and fill with ??? I think sand would find its way out around the rod, but a 1/2" pipe nipple screwed into one end cap would prevent that. Drill opposite end cap with clearance hole for 1/2" pipe. Thread 1/2" into cap, fill with sand and screw cap on opposite end. Cut & grind flush, seal with paint or epoxy and it should be good. Just some thoughts! Bob
 

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My older Napa slide hammer kit came with a replacement screw for a vise grip. It has come in handy a couple of times. It has a female threaded end that the slide hammer rod threads into.

Look in your slide hammer kits and see if there is a piece you've never used, that has vise grip nub that @rwmeyer described.

They look like this (Mine only has one size)


I did those seals on my 140 a while ago. I gave up and pulled the rear end. Even if you get the seal pulled in a tough position like this, it's difficult to get the new seal put back without room to give it a few good whacks. (the 140 is a bit easier to pull)
 

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My older Napa slide hammer kit came with a replacement screw for a vise grip. It has come in handy a couple of times. It has a female threaded end that the slide hammer rod threads into.

Look in your slide hammer kits and see if there is a piece you've never used, that has vise grip nub that @rwmeyer described.

They look like this (Mine only has one size)


I did those seals on my 140 a while ago. I gave up and pulled the rear end. Even if you get the seal pulled in a tough position like this, it's difficult to get the new seal put back without room to give it a few good whacks. (the 140 is a bit easier to pull)
I had these for quite a few years. Two are now broken off. But I never got around to replacing them.

I agree, I would pull the trans and do it right. And its likely faster in the end anyway.
 

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I had these for quite a few years. Two are now broken off. But I never got around to replacing them.

I agree, I would pull the trans and do it right. And its likely faster in the end anyway.

Yep, that's what happened, after frustrating myself for an hour or so. I started looking at pulling the rear. It really wasn't much work. And I think faster in the end.
 

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Yeah, sometimes the engineering that might otherwise be "cussable" works in your favor...like separating the rear end/axle on a 200-series machine to change axle seals, etc. Basically four bolts and you can use it as a coffee table or boat anchor...whatever. Access makes the difference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Well, first I watched a lot of videos, I believe they were from a person named mmrbeef on YouTube. He was a huge wealth of information on how to rebuild the B43G engines. For my rebuild, I used Onanparts.com, and then I talked and bought some parts from Boomer, Boomer's Used Onan Engine Parts.

Boomer was a wealth of information. He has that institutional knowledge that only comes from experience.

If you have the Onan B43G/B48g repair manual, It contains all the measurement specs that you need. And If you have a good set of measurement tools, then its pretty straight forward. I was doing this as a hobby, and so It was quite fun to rebuild the engine. I have done two of them now, and they are somewhat simple engines. I might do a third as well. The 2nd engine I did, I ended up over boring it to .010. I think it made a difference in the power

But I am also a pure-ist. I wanted to keep the original engine, original look, sound, and feel of the tractor. But that comes at a cost, it was not cheap. I got new conn rods, new pistons, new rings, new valves, new valve guides..etc.

I probably spent over $700 in new parts. But you don't need to spend that much. Just getting new rings, maybe new valves, and a gasket set, is somewhat cheap, and can make a world of difference.
 
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