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I have run into a problem with my 318 and its rear tires. When I bought the tractor, I noticed a leak in the right rear tire. It was slow and I had to add air about twice a month. So I just lived with it. I noticed the the leak was getting worse. When I decided to fix it, I found a hole in the tread that was minor, so I tried to break the bead but could not. I took it to a tire shop and they patched the tire for me. When I got home the tire would still go soft. I checked and the leak was around the rim both on the inner and outer rim. I took it back to the tire person and they tried again and told me that the rim or the tire was bad. It still leaks. The rim does not look bad, nor does the tire. I have never had to replace either a tire or rim on any of my tractors before. Do these rims have a problem with sealing tires? Is the best option to put a tube in the tire? Size is 23 x 10.5 x 12.
 

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tire leak

I have run into a problem with my 318 and its rear tires. When I bought the tractor, I noticed a leak in the right rear tire. It was slow and I had to add air about twice a month. So I just lived with it. I noticed the the leak was getting worse. When I decided to fix it, I found a hole in the tread that was minor, so I tried to break the bead but could not. I took it to a tire shop and they patched the tire for me. When I got home the tire would still go soft. I checked and the leak was around the rim both on the inner and outer rim. I took it back to the tire person and they tried again and told me that the rim or the tire was bad. It still leaks. The rim does not look bad, nor does the tire. I have never had to replace either a tire or rim on any of my tractors before. Do these rims have a problem with sealing tires? Is the best option to put a tube in the tire? Size is 23 x 10.5 x 12.
In my experience, tubes are the way to go. Especially with tires that run fairly low air pressures. Rears on my 318 both have tubes.
Steve
 

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If have dealt with similar situations a few times, and ended up installing tubes.
It almost seems as the tires age and get stiff, the beads don't seal well to the rim. I'm sure the lower air pressure used is a factor also.

Sent from my SM-S727VL using Tapatalk
 

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Part of the problem Mark is the low operating tire pressure. 8-10 PSI is not enough pressure to hold the tire against the rim. I know I will get people disputing this but I agree with Joshua tubes is the way to go.
 

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I have this issue with one of the rear tires on my 110. I sanded and painted the rims before putting new tires on so I know the rim surface is smooth. The original weather checked tires that I replaced had no issues holding air. But one tire always has to be aired up about once a month. Tried two new valve stems also and it still does it.
I think a tube is the only thing that will probably fix it.
 

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I read someplace if the tires & rims are in good shape apply a thin amount of silicone calking around the rim before setting the bead.
 

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Mark, I don't have any hands on experience with Slime, but I've read that it will rust/rot the rims. Quit screwing with it and put tubes in!

If you can't remove tire, take it to a tire shop to remove tire. Bring tire & rim home, wire brush rim and run hands CAREFULLY over all surfaces inside of rim, looking/feeling for sharp areas. Sand/grind smooth if found, prime & paint. Return rim to tire shop and install tube. You won't have to mess with it again until tires are totally worn out!

I don't know why people are SO resistant to installing tubes! Bob
 

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I don't know why people are SO resistant to installing tubes! Bob/QUOTE]

Bob, we are the old generation and tubes didn't require a second thought. It also cost us less than a new tire and was the economical repair. But now is the generation of the tubeless tires in most vehicles and it's increasing. Tubes on our slow speed tractors is fine.

I have used silicone in one set of tires (and it worked fine till the tires rotted).
I also have tubes in one of my tractors.
 

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Slime is corrosive but it will last long enough to unload the tractor on some poor unsuspecting buyer, then the rusted out rims are his problem, I know i was a chump that got suckered on a Ariens with slime rotted rims, sand blasting and seal welding the rusted out rims was a nightmare, but i learned a good lesson about Slime. Tubes are the best fix, stay away from Slime.
 

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I decided I should share the resolution to my issue. I took the tire back to the tire shop and asked for a tube. They could not find one with the stem in the right place. So I decided to get a new tire, which is what I did. The issue was solved and I am happy.
 

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Mark, Probably almost 20 years now, I had a leak in a front tire. After a LOT of looking around, I found a tire shop that would tube it. I had the tube and they charged me $10. A few months later, I had a slow leak in a rear tire! I looked around and found that Harbor Freight and Northern Tool both had mini-tire changers for around $30. HF was 15 miles from me so I picked one up. Since then, I've done 3 fronts, 2 rears, and 1 on my 80 cart.

If you plan on keeping/using a lawn tractor, I highly recommend getting a mini-tire changer. Probably the nicest part about doing your own tire changes is that you can inspect your rims, wire brush, prime & paint. REALLY a great investment. Bob
 

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Guess which one the PO had put slime in?
Looked more like an alien growth when I took the tire off.

IMGP0647.jpg
 

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Thanks for the picture Mike. Slime works great, but it comes at a cost in the end. I have a friend who swears by clear caulk. Go with tubes.

I put Slime in all 4 tires on my wife's truck with mag wheels. Over time the wheels would allow air to leak. GM Service Bulletin said to put gasket sealer over the entire inside of the rim. I swore I would sell it before it needed tires. I did. I felt a little sorry for the dealership that we traded it to. Then radiator on her newer SUV started to leak and I felt fine again.:lol:
 

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Tubes are great if you're like me, and you can never get a tire to stop popping off the bead. I managed to just barely get the front tire on my 317 to seat without a tube, then when I was dragging the front sideways to pull the back tire off the tire completely unseated and came off the bead on the inside. After 5 attempts to get it to stop unseating I gave up and threw a tube in. Tire is still not on the bead but at least now it can hold air.

Putting slime or calcium in a tire is just about as bad as putting that radiator stop leak in a small engine. They should outlaw that stuff, with all the straight up lies and false claims.
 
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