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Discussion Starter #1
My neighbor has a 2000 John Deere 425 that tends to quit running while mowing. After talking with him this problem has been going on for some time now. It quits running all of a sudden, as if the key is turned off. If the tractor sits for a couple hours it will star right up. The fix in the past has been "it needs a new fuel pump". Three pumps later (over a few seasons) and its still a problem. He has asked me to look at it the next time it does this. My guess is its not the fuel pump but another component is the fuel control system as this seems to be a heat related problem. It has been very hot here lately and it has quit 3 times this past weekend. Anyone with a 425 experience this?
 

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My first thought is coil getting "heat soaked". As soon as it quits, check - side of coil. Should be ~around 9VDC, Bob
 

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I've had this happen with a bad time delay module. It's located with the wiring on the rear left side of the engine. A low cost item and easy to replace.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for all of the replies. I have the tech manual and will have to wait until it quits again. Was just checking to see if there is a known issue of this problem. Once I can troubleshoot I will post what I have found.
 

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Elderly lady down the rd had similar problem with hers. Couldn’t believe it she let it go on for years. Taking it to the local small engine shop for service every year and they couldn’t figure it out.

We ended up finding a plugged screen in front of the radiator. Problem solved

Also herd of a faulty radiator censure
 

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Without more information, it could be anything (other than the fuel pump, which it obviously isn't).

First question is whether the tractor is actually overheating. What is the temperature gauge doing when the tractor shuts down? If it is up in the red, chances are the cooling system needs service or repair. Some simple things to check are coolant level, fan condition and fan belt tension, and for any buildup of debris on the radiator screen and radiator.
 

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In this case it shouldn’t be the fuel pump. Although never rule out new parts as “good”. I’ve been burned a few times, and seen a few others overlook a new part as ok.
 

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First thing definitely make sure it's not actually over heating. When it quits give it a shot of starting fluid and try to start it. It will tell you right there fuel or electrical. I'd be willing to bet it's electrical. Time delay module like was already suggested would be my first guess. I wouldn't suspect the ignition module unless it's running on one cylinder intermittently before quiting. I would use the procedure in the manual to check the time delay module as soon as it happens. If you can follow the diagnostic procedure you can also jump the module, won't hurt anything or bypass any safeties. All it does is keep the tractor running for a couple seconds when the safety's are actuated so it doesn't shut down because you hit a bump and came off the seat for a split second. Also look to see if the red light on the circuit board comes on when the ignition is on. Does it have a fuel solenoid on the carburetor or is it an earlier version, if it has the solenoid right on the carburetor don't overlook that. The carburetors get plenty hot and it could be choking off the fuel.
You could pull it off and plug the hole to rule it out if you have a fuel problem, it will start run and turn off without it.
There's plenty of them out there with the end cut off. Possibly a pick up coil or ignition coil but unlikely unless it's running on one cylinder before it happens. To be running good and then just turn off like the key was turned off, follow the power to the ignition you're likely loosing it somewhere, should it not be heat related, grounds and loose connections will drive you nuts on one of these.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Well it finally quit again while I was home and able to troubleshoot the problem. The pump in fact failed again! Crazy, seems like every 12 to 18 months the pump fails when it's hot outside. All fuel lines look good, filter clean, electrical connections clean and tight. Grounds are good. Definitely not over heating and tank was very clean and 3/4 full of fuel. This tractor has been well taken care of for as old as it is. Every failed pump has been an OEM John Deere pump ($$). Haven't had time to dissect the old pump yet to see if there is something there. I have seen older posts of this same problem on other sites, but no smoking gun evidence as to why.
 

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My 425 seem to be doing something similar. Today, after about an hour mowing, and then heading back to the shed, it abruptly quit. No sputtering, no warning, just quit. Trying to restart did not produce even a pop. I could hear the fuel pump running every time I tried to restart. After about 5 minutes of trying to restart, I started to get a pop or two. After a couple more minutes, more consistent popping. Then after a few more minutes of trying to restart, it popped and sputtered, and then began running again, as though nothing had happened. This is the third time this has happened. And curiously, the tractor always has died in the same spot in my back yard on the way to the shed! Maybe my back yard is haunted? I suppose something must be overheating, but I can't imagine what. Does anyone have any ideas? Or suggestions as to how to troubleshoot?
 

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Park it in a different shed... or move :lol: But seriously, check all connections and circuit breakers. Then start with ignition related items. Heat will cause resistance. I’ve seen wires warm up and the insulation gets soft allowing the break in the strands to separate. When it cools it retracts and allows contact. GM HEI ignition modules would do the same, also. Could be a circuit breaker getting weak and a bounce in that spot of your yard could be enough to trip it.

The wife had a Tracker that would shut off every time we pulled out of one of the exits at our local Home Depot. I just stopped going out that exit. Never found the problem, and sold the car two years later with no other instances of that occurring.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
My 425 seem to be doing something similar. Today, after about an hour mowing, and then heading back to the shed, it abruptly quit. No sputtering, no warning, just quit. Trying to restart did not produce even a pop. I could hear the fuel pump running every time I tried to restart. After about 5 minutes of trying to restart, I started to get a pop or two. After a couple more minutes, more consistent popping. Then after a few more minutes of trying to restart, it popped and sputtered, and then began running again, as though nothing had happened. This is the third time this has happened. And curiously, the tractor always has died in the same spot in my back yard on the way to the shed! Maybe my back yard is haunted? I suppose something must be overheating, but I can't imagine what. Does anyone have any ideas? Or suggestions as to how to troubleshoot?
The issue we had is it quit just like yours, but there was not a pop as you mention. cranking produced nothing. Only after sitting for a couple of hours would it start right up. You say you can hear the pump running, can you see fuel in the in-line filter? Take the fuel line off the carb and aim it away from you or into an empty container. Turn on the key and see if any fuel comes out with the pump running. If no fuel then the issue is from the hose back toward the pump. If you have fuel, it is from the hose connection forward to the engine / carb / ignition. The way our 425 was acting I was 90% convinced it was the fuel shutoff solenoid on the carb, but diagnostic testing proved it was in fact the pump. The Deere technical manual has a good troubleshooting section just make sure your on the correct engine and serial number. Still cant see a reason why this machine goes through OEM fuel pumps so often.
 

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Fuel pumps are cooled by the fuel that goes thru them, or if pump in tank, by the fuel that surrounds them. I would gather a plugging up of the fuel pickup or a collapsing fuel line between tank and pump. Causing a burnt out of the pump.
 

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Well, I decided to replace the time delay module, since they are fairly cheap. The new one showed up today, and when I went to replace it - WTF?? - nothing on the tractor resembled the stubby cylinder that I have seen described many times as the TDM. Are there two styles ? Do some 425s not have a TDM ? Any advice appreciated. Thanks.
 

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The original is square and is mounted on the left rear corner of the engine, in the mass of wires above the starter nose.
 

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The ignition module is square and mounted on the motor and is not cheap. Your time delay module should be as you described a cylinder shape around 3/4" diameter little over an inch long less than $30. They all came with them as far as I know but they can be eliminated. The only purpose it serves is to keep the engine from shutting down if you hit a bump and come off the seat for a split second and trigger the safety switch. It will be tied into the wiring going to the ignition module, the power from the ignition passes through it before it goes to the ignition. You should be able to follow the positive lead from the ignition switch to the time delay module. Hope this helps.
 

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Maybe try to install an electric fuel pump. Time delay module would also be my suggestion being it starts after setting awhile. Good luck!
 

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I don't own a 425 myself, but I've heard of situations on the 425/445 where the fuel lines can deteriorate over the course of a bunch of years and lose their rigidity. It might be possible that when it's cold, the lines are stiffer and stay open, but when things get good and heat soaked under there, the lines become soft and collapse under the suction from the fuel pump. That could also cause the fuel pump to burn out prematurely too since it's not getting the fuel it needs to stay cool/lubricated. If you can prove it's a fuel issue (give it a little squirt of ether/starting fluid when it dies), that might be something to check.
 

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Had a few problems with those symptoms and different fixes. My personal 425 was dropping a cylinder when hot, sometimes quitting altogether. Ended up being the "ignitor" on mine... square module screwed to the side of your left hand engine mount plate. Expensive little cusses. I've also replaced countless time delay modules on many many friends/familys/customers 425's. They're cheap and every Deere dealer under the sun has a box full of them because they commonly fail. Other potential things to check... valves too tight? Also had a Deere 345 doing the same thing once and ended up replacing the carb. Turns out it was warping from the heat of the engine and the float would stick shut tighter'n hell until it cooled down and would allow the float bowl to fill again. Thinking my friend might have the same problem with his 425 right now as he's exhausted all of the typical culprits and hasn't fixed the problem yet.
 
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