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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've historically been a 200 series guy but ended up with a deal on a 318 and then another deal on a 49 blower so this year I will be trying that as a main snow machine. I've picked up along the way that the gearbox on these blowers like to grenade themselves. I think I read in a thread somewhere that the guy with broken off gears blamed himself for engaging the PTO at normal engine operating rev.

Is the accepted method of using these blowers to throttle way down, engage the PTO and then throttle back up?
 

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i throttle down and engage PTO on mine even for mower deck
 

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Page 15 - Operators Manual 49 Snowthrower OMM89078 -
One-fourth throttle position to 1st engage (to prevent clutch damage) then increase engine speed for best overall performance.
Doesn't stipulate which machine/tractor but the black & white photo = looks to be a 316 or 318 type.
Usually, it's 1/4 or 1/3 throttle position to 1st engage attachments on a 318.

Is interesting as later, newer model tractors may require engaging an attachment at higher throttle settings to avoid stalling the engine.
 

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I have always made a habit of engaging any machine at a low RPM and throttling up, regardless the application. My reasoning is that it minimizes the initial torque load going through the system and doing so at a higher RPM doesn't gain you anything except wear and tear. Anytime I hear an operator engaging a machine where you hear the belt chirping I grit my teeth (because it indicates the belt is taking the punishment of getting the load started). Dealers like it though because it sells more parts!
 

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I have always made a habit of engaging any machine at a low RPM and throttling up, regardless the application. My reasoning is that it minimizes the initial torque load going through the system and doing so at a higher RPM doesn't gain you anything except wear and tear. Anytime I hear an operator engaging a machine where you hear the belt chirping I grit my teeth (because it indicates the belt is taking the punishment of getting the load started). Dealers like it though because it sells more parts!
This is also my first year with a 318 and 49 blower. My 214 and 37a didn't mind it, but I can definitely see how the 49 wouldn't enjoy that kind of punishment. Especially when I see how much the gearbox is to replace/repair.
 

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I am not sure if a 37A is equipped with an auger shear bolt, but that is also very important in protecting the drivetrain/gearbox. Verify the shear bolt is the correct PN and not just a bolt that fits! The correct bolt will shear before damage occurs.
 

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I am not sure if a 37A is equipped with an auger shear bolt, but that is also very important in protecting the drivetrain/gearbox. Verify the shear bolt is the correct PN and not just a bolt that fits! The correct bolt will shear before damage occurs.
I have 4 37a to pick parts off of if something breaks. I don't think my main one has a shear bolt setup
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have 4 37a to pick parts off of if something breaks. I don't think my main one has a shear bolt setup
I'm pretty sure that only the latest iteration had a shear bolt. I think the early models just planned to smoke the belt.

I will have to look at the feet and scraper bar on this unit that I have but I am not impressed after my first run. It left a bunch on the driveway, you definitely have to keep it fed and it seems to need a tall chute mod stat.
 

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I thought they all did. Sooner or later the auger is gonna bite into something it can't chew and the belt doesn't start slipping quickly enough. I use a mild steel 1/4" shear bolt on my model 50. I usually have to replace it once or twice a winter. It doesn't always shear off all at once. It sometimes gradually breaks instead and that's what I want. Only takes a minute to replace it.

I always engage mine at a lower RPM and ease into it. My 400 has a manual PTO and I can work it like the clutch on a stick shift vehicle or tractor. Smooth and steady and not too slow or fast.

I have 4 37a to pick parts off of if something breaks. I don't think my main one has a shear bolt setup
 

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Engaging and disengaging at a little less than half throttle is wise and reduces wear/tear. The owners manual discusses this as noted above.

A lower rpm during engagement limits pto slip during engagement and prolongs its life.

Similiarly, a lower rpm during disengagement protects the pto as it has a built in brake that is designed to stop the rotating mass of the implement in use. Slower rotational forces produce less wear on the pto. This is all discussed in the owner and service manuals.
 
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