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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is my first time doing significant rebuild work, and I'm looking for a little extra guidance that may not be found in the Kohler manuals I have. My JD 314 has the Kohler K321 engine, and I had to replace a piston rod after it broke last autumn. I took the block to the machine shop and had them clean things up and install the new piston, and everything checks out okay. I have the block back and need to reassemble everything (I recorded every step of the disassembly process for reference). A few specific questions.

1) I have never installed a PTO clutch assembly before, and the only manual I've found is for a JD 140, which I think is pretty much the same clutch, either a Warner or Ogura. Is the process the same for a 314 as it is for a 140?

2) The machine shop set the valves and points for me, and said I should re-adjust the valves after about 10 hours of runtime. Does that sound right, and does anyone have tips for that process?

3) Any other advice that the manuals don't cover? Tips learned from experience?
 

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Best advice I read for these kohler engines is to mark the flywheel BEFORE putting the cover on.
Theres 2 TDC Mark's, 1 is for timing.
 

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Fx, Let's cross 1 bridge at a time!
1. WHICH pto do you have, Ogura or Warner? The field windings with the wire sticking out have different shapes. The Warner is square and the Ogura has a taper on the bottom sides. Thet mount similar but some precautions are needed depending on manufacturer.

2. 10 hours sounds about right to readjust valves. I'm not sure if this done hot or cold though! Go to WFMFiles.com, scroll down to "Kohler" and then down to Kohler Service Manual Single Cylinder - KT91, KT141, KT161, K181, K241, K301, K321, K341.pdf. This will give you ALL the info you need for your K321... I don't know what Kohler manual you have!

3. No additional tips I can think of right now.

Bob
 

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While on wfmfiles also DL the rebuilders manual. Lots of good info in there too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Fx, Let's cross 1 bridge at a time!
1. WHICH pto do you have, Ogura or Warner? The field windings with the wire sticking out have different shapes. The Warner is square and the Ogura has a taper on the bottom sides. Thet mount similar but some precautions are needed depending on manufacturer.

2. 10 hours sounds about right to readjust valves. I'm not sure if this done hot or cold though! Go to WFMFiles.com, scroll down to "Kohler" and then down to Kohler Service Manual Single Cylinder - KT91, KT141, KT161, K181, K241, K301, K321, K341.pdf. This will give you ALL the info you need for your K321... I don't know what Kohler manual you have!

3. No additional tips I can think of right now.

Bob
My PTO is the Ogura. I have the manual from WFMFiles.com.
 

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Not sure what your questions are on the clutch assembly, but here's the picture from https://partscatalog.deere.com/
266230

Here's some general assembly instructions:
Mount field winding coil (#2) on engine, leave bolts loose. Wrap about 3 layers of tape around outside on coil windings. Slip rotor (#4) on crankshaft without key and rotate rotor. Turn rotor. If it sounds like it's hitting/resting on coil windings tape, move windings until no contact and tighten bolts...use caution not to pinch wire coming into back of coil! Once winding bolts are tight, spin rotor as a double check and remove rotor. Install key (#16) and replace rotor. IIRC, (from 35 years ago!) key #16 should stick out from rotor, maybe 1/8". Install springs (#5), slip sleeve #6 onto shaft an align notch in #6 with key. Install armature #7, sleeve #13, washer & bolt. Set gap (.018" ??) by adjusting nuts #8 in ALL # SLOTS in armature. Remove spark plug and turn engine over about 1/3 turn and recheck gap. That should be it!

Any questions, just ask! Bob
 
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Yes, well spotted! I should capture that in the notes. I had caught that issue a long time ago

Sent from my BlackBerry KEYone using Tapatalk
 

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i remember that rebuild
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Not sure what your questions are on the clutch assembly, but here's the picture from https://partscatalog.deere.com/
View attachment 266230
Here's some general assembly instructions:
Mount field winding coil (#2) on engine, leave bolts loose. Wrap about 3 layers of tape around outside on coil windings. Slip rotor (#4) on crankshaft without key and rotate rotor. Turn rotor. If it sounds like it's hitting/resting on coil windings tape, move windings until no contact and tighten bolts...use caution not to pinch wire coming into back of coil! Once winding bolts are tight, spin rotor as a double check and remove rotor. Install key (#16) and replace rotor. IIRC, (from 35 years ago!) key #16 should stick out from rotor, maybe 1/8". Install springs (#5), slip sleeve #6 onto shaft an align notch in #6 with key. Install armature #7, sleeve #13, washer & bolt. Set gap (.018" ??) by adjusting nuts #8 in ALL # SLOTS in armature. Remove spark plug and turn engine over about 1/3 turn and recheck gap. That should be it!

Any questions, just ask! Bob
Can you explain a bit more what you mean by wrapping the field coil in tape? How and why?
 

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I've never measured any of this, but I have heard and seen pics of damaged coils due to being hit/rubbed on by the rotor. Another member in a Forum, don't remember which one, posted about the tape and I thought it was an excellent idea.

When the clutch is assembled, the ID of the rotor fits over the OD of the coil with a certain amount of clearance so that neither part rubs against the other while the engine is running. The rotor is a snug fit on the crankshaft, maybe .001" loose, so it's position is fixed. The coil has clearance holes for the screws, with holes being maybe 1/32" larger than the screws, and the coil can be mounted and can float anywhere around in this clearance until tightened, possibly causing a rub between the 2 pieces. Wrapping tape on the OD of the coil more or less centers the coil inside the ID of the rotor to eliminate any chance of the 2 parts from rubbing and causing damage.

Start by trying the rotor onto the crank. You should be able to easily slide the rotor all the way on the crank and then be able to rotate it...no key installed yet. If the rotor sticks or binds, remove and inspect for burrs, file as needed to remove burrs. Next, slide rotor back, install key, and verify rotor doesn't bind on key... remove burrs as needed. Remove rotor and key and put aside. Clean the OD of the coil with parts cleaner, or at least a clean paper/cloth wipe. Put about 3 wraps of masking/painters tape on the OD of the coil where it will be fitting inside of the rotor. If all you have is electrical tape, but another turn or so as this is slightly thinner than a masking tape. Try the rotor into the coil to make sure it fits! Remove a turn of tape if too tight or add a turn if really loose. You're now ready for final assembly!
Slide coil onto crankshaft, followed by the rotor. Slip coil into rotor ID and slide both towards engine. Lube screws for coil & install. Inspect coil wire to verify it's not pinched between coil and engine, tighten mounting screws. Slide rotor back and remove tape from coil. I would put rotor over coil again and rotate, just to verify it's not hitting, then slide back, install key, and slide towards engine. Continue assembly, set air gap, and done!

A lot of "words" here and simply means "center coil!" Many off my responses are long winded, but I'd rather use more description/info than less. Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I've never measured any of this, but I have heard and seen pics of damaged coils due to being hit/rubbed on by the rotor. Another member in a Forum, don't remember which one, posted about the tape and I thought it was an excellent idea.

When the clutch is assembled, the ID of the rotor fits over the OD of the coil with a certain amount of clearance so that neither part rubs against the other while the engine is running. The rotor is a snug fit on the crankshaft, maybe .001" loose, so it's position is fixed. The coil has clearance holes for the screws, with holes being maybe 1/32" larger than the screws, and the coil can be mounted and can float anywhere around in this clearance until tightened, possibly causing a rub between the 2 pieces. Wrapping tape on the OD of the coil more or less centers the coil inside the ID of the rotor to eliminate any chance of the 2 parts from rubbing and causing damage.

Start by trying the rotor onto the crank. You should be able to easily slide the rotor all the way on the crank and then be able to rotate it...no key installed yet. If the rotor sticks or binds, remove and inspect for burrs, file as needed to remove burrs. Next, slide rotor back, install key, and verify rotor doesn't bind on key... remove burrs as needed. Remove rotor and key and put aside. Clean the OD of the coil with parts cleaner, or at least a clean paper/cloth wipe. Put about 3 wraps of masking/painters tape on the OD of the coil where it will be fitting inside of the rotor. If all you have is electrical tape, but another turn or so as this is slightly thinner than a masking tape. Try the rotor into the coil to make sure it fits! Remove a turn of tape if too tight or add a turn if really loose. You're now ready for final assembly!
Slide coil onto crankshaft, followed by the rotor. Slip coil into rotor ID and slide both towards engine. Lube screws for coil & install. Inspect coil wire to verify it's not pinched between coil and engine, tighten mounting screws. Slide rotor back and remove tape from coil. I would put rotor over coil again and rotate, just to verify it's not hitting, then slide back, install key, and slide towards engine. Continue assembly, set air gap, and done!

A lot of "words" here and simply means "center coil!" Many off my responses are long winded, but I'd rather use more description/info than less. Bob
Buddy, that is the kind of explanation I like! Very helpful. I have cleaned up the coil real good and it's in excellent condition. There are a couple of spots where the ID of the rotor has scraped lightly, but not bad for a 40-year-old piece of equipment. I'll put some tape around the coil's OD and see how it goes.
 

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capton tape is what was used on the coil
 
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