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Terminals for #10-#12 should be good for at least the rating of the wire. #10 wire is rated at 25 or 30 amps, depending on which chart you look at. You'll be safe with connectors for #10-#12 wire. Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Ok what about the blue ones that are for #14 and #16 are they sufficient for a 25 amp circuit also?
 

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Now you guys have me wondering about mine.
Havent looked at it since last year.
Think I'll go out and pull the side panel and look.
 

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Here is a chart with plenty of safety factor built in for CONTINUOUS DC current as a factor of wire length. Since these pigtails are quite short and the maximum current should be intermittent for a properly functioning charging system, the 12 gauge wire is a very good choice and 14 would do in a pinch. Do not use 16 gauge wire in this application...

268725


Chuck
 

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Just checked my alt plug and rewire. Looks like new yet. I've put 80 hrs on it since doing it.
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While I dont know the amp rating of those blue connectors, plus I didnt really think about it last year. I just wanted it fixed, lol.
Apparently their fine on my machine. The clean voltage relay is working.
If the alt thinks it has to output more power or constantly at a high amp rate, any connector will melt eventually.
Ok, I feel better now.
 

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Skwirl, A thought/suggestion! Unless you're a whole lot neater than me, I don't see any type of "grease" in your connectors. The shrink tubing will seal the wire to terminal connection, although I have used "grease" on the OD of the wire & terminal prior to shrinking, but air can still attack both male & female terminals at the connection point causing corrosion. A dab of dielectric grease on the female connector, reconnect, and sealed!

I've been smothering my battery terminals with Vaseline since the late 60's. Batteries fail after 5-8 years but the connection points are bright & shiny and no charging or starting issues due to battery connection. Bob
 

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The dielectric grease your referring to has 1 big draw back.
It doesnt conduct electricity and can possible act as an insulator preventing electric flow.

There is a correct way to use/apply that grease.
But smearing it inside the female connector isnt it.
The intended use of that grease is to prevent moisture getting in and causing corrosion. But you dont want it on the terminals themselves.
If the terminals dont fit tightly together, the grease insulates and prevents electric flow. The electric may only flow thru the scratch marked area, not the whole tab area. That can cause heat. Which is what we dont want in this instance especially.
There is a correct way to use the grease. Apply it around the outside of the plastic cover over the male terminal. When that slides in the female, now you have a seal to prevent moisture.
If you have a connector with a rubber seal, the green thing is the seal on this relay pigtail.
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The grease would be applied to the green seal only, not the terminals.
Then the correct relay would be installed. Heres a pic of the correct relay, it's a shrouded relay.
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These parts are ideal for this instance, cause of their location on the tractor.

Dielectric grease does work, but it can cause problems if not used correctly.

Electrical connections should have 2 things -
Clean and Tight.
 

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Skwirl, When terminals are connected, there's isn't 100% metal to metal contact and any areas not making contact are accessible to air & corrosion. The grease eliminates the air and is also scraped away where there is metal to metal contact, providing a proper electrical connection.

Since we both have such different opinions, I'll agree to disagree with your thoughts so this doesn't go on & on! Bob
 
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Its actually not my opinion, it's what was taught by a major engine manufacturer. I'm just repeating info/knowledge from people that study this kind of stuff.
And theres no argument, you can do it your way. It wont affect me, or my tractor, lol.
I'm not here to issue mandates, you gotta do it this way. I offer little bits of info, if I can help.
Like the old saying, you can lead a horse to water, but you cant make him drink, lol.
 

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Theres a few other things the PO should consider checking concerning the battery. But, I'm thinking hes not mechanically inclined, so the easiest is he should buy a new battery when the charging system is repaired.
 

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Yeah at this age (the tractor :) ) replacing anything electrical in the charging/battery circuit will most likely be an improvement.

OP, don't worry so much over some of the technicalities, but do spend some time looking at your crimping equipment. Not all crimpers are are built equally. Also, sealing with lined heat shrink will help, like Skwirl's nice work above. (I think the last set of crimpers I got were about $150, granted they look like bolt cutters and will do .MIL spec HD crimps on 0000)

Most of the electrical terminals on these tractors will be the blue stuff (12-14), the 2 wires from the alternator I used yellow (8-10) with 10ga wire.

I don't use grease or anything on connections (excepting battery terminals).

Another simple improvement would be some new battery cables. Also check the fusible links, if you had issues they might be crispy. Just bend/flex them a little and make sure they aren't crumbly or welded solid. One of mine was heat welded like a piece of solid romex wire.
 

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On the subject of dialectric grease....I have a fan in the ceiling of the shower, it is rated for damp duty. It died after 2 years due to an intermittant connection, the plastic connector housing was burnt from the heat at the bad connection. I asked the company if using dialectric grease may have prevented such a failure and they said 'do not use dialectric grease on that connector'. I was surprised by their response as I thought it's use would be appropriate for that environment.
 

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On the subject of dialectric grease....I have a fan in the ceiling of the shower, it is rated for damp duty. It died after 2 years due to an intermittant connection, the plastic connector housing was burnt from the heat at the bad connection. I asked the company if using dialectric grease may have prevented such a failure and they said 'do not use dialectric grease on that connector'. I was surprised by their response as I thought it's use would be appropriate for that environment.
Cause you would have made it worse by insulating it from conducting electricity and made the connector hotter.
Dielectric grease has a use, just not on or in terminal connectors.
Truck and trailer plugs are another problem area with dielectric grease. Yes, it prevents them rusting for a while. Then they rust and you go to use the trailer and smear more grease. After a while the lights dont work anymore. I've cleaned quite a few plugs over the years, getting that grease out. Then the lights work, cause the insulation is gone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #54 ·
Does the red wire coming out of the relay need to go on the positive or negative side of the starter solenoid?
 
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