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A small in line moisture trap attached to the bottom of the gun is all I've ever used. Never had a problem, even on the hottest summer days. Only costs a couple of bucks, and is disposable when the job is done.
 

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Again- FWIW...I had an old rattle can of Agco/Oliver Meadow Green paint that I bought a few years ago but never used that I used to spray on a repair I did to my 318 earlier this year (the colors are not that dissimilar). Instead of just clearing the tip I sprayed the cast iron frame on my Oliver 1755 with the remainder of it. No washing, no de-greasing, no prep work. That was a while ago and it still looks good and it hasn't pealed anywhere. The same goes for the rattle can job I did to my sickle mower a number of years ago. Agco rattle can paint seems to be self-priming, weather tolerant at time of spraying, dries hard, and seems to last pretty good. It does fade some over the years however, probably because of the lack of hardeners in it (I really don't know why). I'd bet that JD paint is just as heavy pigment wise and is just as good as Agco's... they might even be made by the same paint company.

There is nothing bad about rattle can paint other than it has no hardener in it. But even that can be remedied. The solution that I heard about (but never done) is to exhaust all propellant out of the can, poke a hole in the can and drain as much of the paint and pigment out as possible, then use it like you would any concentrate of pigment (thin it, add hardener, etc.). Probably not cost effective doing it this way though.
 

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I agree that the spray cans have come a long way. some are much better than others. And if you stick to the same lot numbers your likely to get a good match between cans. The problem I have with doing larger jobs my finger gets tired! And as in all paint work dry edges are a no no. Once you start you need to keep going. And, I seem to have a habit of placing my finger to far forward and after a few minutes of spraying paint collects at the end eventually dropping off and onto the work. Happens every time! Especially with gloves on. Seem I'll never learn!

As for paint that has primer included? No such thing. Primer function is totally different than paint. So called self primers work on rough surfaces like hot rolled steel or cast metals. But with them little prep is ever required or even possible. Your not likely to buff and polish rough metal. But when you want that perfect paint job like what came on your new Ford pickup, there are few shortcuts. Your rattle can job may look good now but a year or two and a few washings later, well? Enjoy it while its there!
 
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HVLP takes some practice. My only practice was on cardboard 1 minute before i sprayed my hanging sheetmetal using the purple Harbor Freight gun with JD green pain and Valpsar Hardener. Make sure the pressure is set on the regulator and the gun. It lays it on fast so keep the gun moving always. I got some orange peel but it is super shiny! JD rattle can give a great coating too.

Great job!
 

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I agree that the spray cans have come a long way. some are much better than others. And if you stick to the same lot numbers your likely to get a good match between cans. The problem I have with doing larger jobs my finger gets tired! And as in all paint work dry edges are a no no. Once you start you need to keep going. And, I seem to have a habit of placing my finger to far forward and after a few minutes of spraying paint collects at the end eventually dropping off and onto the work. Happens every time! Especially with gloves on. Seem I'll never learn!

As for paint that has primer included? No such thing. Primer function is totally different than paint. So called self primers work on rough surfaces like hot rolled steel or cast metals. But with them little prep is ever required or even possible. Your not likely to buff and polish rough metal. But when you want that perfect paint job like what came on your new Ford pickup, there are few shortcuts. Your rattle can job may look good now but a year or two and a few washings later, well? Enjoy it while its there!
I have seen rattle can jobs that were wet sanded between coats and dozens of coats applied. Then a dozen clear coats on top of those. They looked like professional paint jobs. Deep vivid colors. I can't attest to the longevity of such a paint job though. These jobs were witnessed decades ago when they put 0.05oz of pigment in a 16oz can of paint. I believe that percentage has gone way up as can nozzle technology has improved.

Speaking of nozzles, they do make numerous trigger type can spray devices these days which helps to eliminate that dripping and finger fatigue. Some of the better paints come with adjustable spray nozzles now too. At least the ones I've used had the ability to change from horizontal to vertical fan patterns. So, yup, rattle cans have improved, what's inside them has improved too.

Eastwood is a place to find some of this new and improved paint equipment. I look at them as the Harbor Freight of paint and body work...plus a whole lot more.
 

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Been a great thread, learned alot thanks.
I repainted (with both "rattle can" and brush) a 1988 322 with the official JD green paint. Considering how difficult it is for my 6'-3" body and size 15 boots to mount and dismount the tractor, it's a wonder that there's still paint on the rear deck. Of course one can't hover and then drop into the seat, so expect eventual scratches. You could change into bunny rabbit slippers. :unsure: Hmm?
 

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I repainted (with both "rattle can" and brush) a 1988 322 with the official JD green paint. Considering how difficult it is for my 6'-3" body and size 15 boots to mount and dismount the tractor, it's a wonder that there's still paint on the rear deck. Of course one can't hover and then drop into the seat, so expect eventual scratches. You could change into bunny rabbit slippers. :unsure: Hmm?
I mow in flip-flops. I do everything in shorts and flip-flops during the summer and late into the fall. Many things that folks would likely cringe if they saw me doing them. Like welding and using a chainsaw. It's hard to coax me into wearing real shoes when it's hot out. I only wear shoes when I go to work and only because fully closed shoes are required to drive for the company. Otherwise I'd wear the bare minimum there too.
 

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So the side panels came out decent but the Fender Pan came out blotchy paint gun issues and experience and I don't know what else but my question is I used rest oleum enamel John Deere green if I paint it again in a couple days do I sand it 1st and rough it up with like 1500 or 2000 grit and then put another coat on?
We sprayed our JD 332 we used all John Deere recommended paint & paint thinner. 1 quart goes a long ways cheap compared to spray cans. We put like 4 thin coats and sand in between coats with 1000 grit. We use some 600, 800 &1000 sand paper wet. My brother-in-law has experience with the paint gun he was teaching me for the first time how to set up the gun spraying into cardboard box to get a fine mist not too heavy.
 

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Ptzprg – nice work. I’ve always used the JD rattle cans on all of my tractors since I don’t have any experience with an HVLP. No matter what you decide to use, it’s all in the prep work. I always sandblast my parts, light sand and then two coats of a good primer, sanding between coats. I then apply 3 coats of JD green (24 hours minimum between coats) and use 00000 steel wool between each coat. I’ve always been pleased with the end result. The JD rattle can wears well over time, my 420 was done in 2007 and still looks great today & it’s used and not a trailer or show queen.
 

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