Weekend Freedom Machines banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
420 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Tractor is fine still running good just ordered a belt. Anyway.. for future builds what is the best dial bore gauge to get that will do 40 and 50cc up to 500cc or bigger. And will that gauge be all I need to determine how far off the the cylinder or cylinders are?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,791 Posts

I have one similar to this, and I think it has worked well for me. I am no master mechanic, and measurements are just relative to the unworn area at the bottom of the cylinder. But it certainly gives me guidance on whether the bore is good enough or not.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,676 Posts
You will need micrometers that cover the bore size range to set the gage. You can get by with "inch" mics if you have them. If you plan to buy some, you might want metric mics and dial bore gage. Don't know what you are working on, but guessing the bores are metric?

tommyhawk
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
10,384 Posts
The challenges of rebuilding a Yanmar three cylinder diesel like the one in your 332 tractor are a bit different than most internal combustion engines due to the very high compression (355 PSI and up) that these engines utilize. Have you measured the engine's compression to determine if -- and how urgently you may need to do internal work? It takes special gauges to just do the compression measurement, so you will need those before proceeding. Here is the factory test method and specification on the per cylinder compression minimums, and the maximum allowed differences from one cylinder to any other.

Font Motor vehicle Engineering Machine Auto part


Chuck
 

· Registered
Joined
·
406 Posts
I would look at the Fowler brand mentioned here previously. They are affordable for a home shop. They have many different options to pick out what you need. I went with the xtender dial gauge for my work. 1.4 to 6 inch. I was thinking I might need for checking small brake cylinders after my Onan rebuilding.
Dan
 

· Registered
Joined
·
253 Posts
I would agree with Chuckv about determining the need to go into a Yanmar engine, at least on a 332. In my limited experience with 332's the internal engine components are next to "bullet proof". If fact, that's why I like 332's. Other than a couple of injection pump delivery valve seals, I have never gone into a 332 engine other than to set the valve lash on one (because I thought I needed to and in reality I didn't).
That being said, most new diesel owners tend to express concern over the engine blowby. Don't confuse visible diesel engine blowby (with the engine warm and at high idle or under load) with an internal engine issue. It is just the nature of the beast. Change the engine oil and filter, insure the air cleaner element is clean/replaced and note the engine hours. Run the living daylights out of ol' girl while watching the oil level on the dipstick before each use. Once the oil level goes from the full mark to the bottom of the cross hatch area on the dipstick, note the engine hours again. That will give you a sense of the internal engine wear. Note: For those folks who like additional data points, you can also keep track of the amount of fuel used to how long it takes to get to the bottom of the cross hatch area.
My guess is once you get the results from this test, it will change your mind (from a cost/benefit analysis) about going deeper into the engine.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
420 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The challenges of rebuilding a Yanmar three cylinder diesel like the one in your 332 tractor are a bit different than most internal combustion engines due to the very high compression (355 PSI and up) that these engines utilize. Have you measured the engine's compression to determine if -- and how urgently you may need to do internal work? It takes special gauges to just do the compression measurement, so you will need those before proceeding. Here is the factory test method and specification on the per cylinder compression minimums, and the maximum allowed differences from one cylinder to any other.

View attachment 286450

Chuck
I’m going to run it until something goes wrong. Tractor runs great no worries there. I’m working on a Honda mini trail I’ve had apart since I was like 18. I got it all back together and running now. I had motorcycle tech at washtenaw community college hone and check the cylinder. Everything inside and outside is new. I plan to work on Harley’s at some point and old ford and Chrysler stuff. 440 383 460 for examples.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
10,384 Posts
The little Honda bikes are great fun, and that one looks sharp! (y)

You should get at least 4000 hours on a 332 engine that gets proper maintenance -- so you have a ways to go before it needs anything internal. My X495 diesel had over 2500 hours on it when I sold it due to downsizing and leaving the state, and I bet it goes to 5K easily...it started on the first revolution every time and never had any internal work needed. Yanmar diesel tractor engines in the Deere lineup are very fuel efficient too as observed above.

Chuck
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
10,384 Posts
From the x495 owners manual, the service intervals are long, and address simple items -- not even a valve adjustment check in 1000 hours.
Every 200 Hours
· Change transaxle oil and filter.
Every 200 Hours or Annually
· Change engine oil and filter.
· Check fan belt tension.
· Check and clean battery.
· Lubricate steering spindles, axle pivot and steering cylinder.
· Check MFWD oil level.
· Clean radiator and hydraulic oil cooler screens and cooling fins.
· Check tire pressure.
· Check and tighten clamps for cooling and air intake system.
· Change fuel filter.
· Monitor air restriction indicator for service of air cleaner.
Every 1000 Hours or Every 2 Years
· Change engine coolant.
Chuck
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,072 Posts
yanmar diesels can last a long time
refers have had some with 15k+ hours on them
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1990 332

· Registered
Joined
·
234 Posts
You will need micrometers that cover the bore size range to set the gage. You can get by with "inch" mics if you have them. If you plan to buy some, you might want metric mics and dial bore gage. Don't know what you are working on, but guessing the bores are metric?

tommyhawk
This. You need the micrometer to set the bore gauge first.

I had a $60 no name special (amazon, ebay) that worked good. They come in the red case. Price goes up from there.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top