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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Edit: This should have been here.

Hello, I'm learning/breaking on a 74-78 era Snapper RER. The motor is an 8hp Briggs with a 1993 date code, so it's been swapped before. The only way I can get it to run at all (and it's not good) is to limit the throttle as much as possible. I've got the fuel shutoff almost closed and the idle screw down about as low as possible. Anything more and it wants to cut out.

It's got a Nikki carb on it, and I don't think it's original either. The choke bracket where the control arm connects has a small vertical nub that hits the air cleaner, preventing the choke from functioning, so I'm about certain that this carb doesn't belong on here.

All images that I can find for this carb show a main jet adjustment screw, but this one doesn't have one. It looks like another generic carb that I got recently where the adjustment screw has been replaced with a solid piece of metal, and I guess you're just supposed to go with whatever it gives you.

The part number on the carb is 799252 G02714 E3082 A168. The few search results that mention what motor this carb goes to all show HP ratings around to 15-17 hp. I think, even if I get all the gaskets replaced, it's going to be sending more gas than this 8hp wants if it's supposed to be on something with twice the power.

I guess that's my question. Is it important for a replacement carburetor to match the HP of the motor, or does it not matter?

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I replaced it with the correct carburetor. Runs great.

The gasket leaving the Nikki was homemade and only had a small hole for the mixture to pass through. Previous owner knew what was up.
 

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Carburation is a tricky process...not only does the quantity of air/fuel mix need to be sized properly to the engine displacement, but the velocity of the air through the venturi needs to be at or near the speed of sound to properly atomize/nebulize the liquid fuel correctly. Getting the original model carburetor ensures that the design intentions are preserved...

Chuck
 
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