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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey you Cub Cadet gurus.. I'm removing the clutch adapter on the flywheel on my IH CC 1200 so I can use the engine for another tractor. Or I'm trying to anyway. It's a weird looking design. How the heck does it come off?

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Looks like it threads on. Put rope in the spark plug hole and try to spin the adapter with a pipe wrench.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Yah it must be threaded. Don't see any other way it's being held on. A couple IH CC web sites show a pic of the adapter but not how it goes on. Flywheel rotation is clockwise looking at it from back side of the engine so the adapter should be lefty loosey. I don't wanna bugger it up in case I put the engine back in the 1200 so I'm a bit reluctant to use a pipe wrench. I could use a couple feet of electrical tape to mummify the outer edges of the pulley groove so it doesn't get chewed up I guess. Could try a thick belt wrapped around it too.

I tried my antique impact driver on the flywheel screen screws. Doesn't get used much. Not as mint as I remembered it but still in pretty good condition. I gave it a go because the bolts holding the screen on were Philips and wouldn't budge, and the impact bits were the right size for a change. None of the screws moved a hair though. All I accomplished was to pinch my left hand index finger in the spring several times (I'm a slow learner).

So then I used my patent pending chisel trick. Punched a small V notch in the screw head on one edge then used the notch to tap the screwhead sideways to the left and loosen it enough to use a regular Philips screwdriver. Worked for all of them. I did that on the 140 screen too but they were smaller diameter screws and the heads peeled off instead of the screws turning. Had to drill them out. Worked out ok but removing broken bolts/screws is always a PITA.

Edit: added fancy chisel graphic.
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I’m almost to the point where I use the chisel before the impact driver, especially if I’m replacing the screws. On a motorcycle or something where it’s a special screw I’ll still use the impact but the chisel works so well (like on the flywheel screen screws of a JD Kawasaki) I use it straight off. The phillps are almost always buggered up first anyway. It’s also a great way to see if someone has been into the motor before me! If I see unmolested screws I’m fairly certain that everything is original 👍🏻
 

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I just put the impact driver adapter on a 1/2 impact and see what breaks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It's a K301. It looks like the adapter must be threaded on the crank like a flywheel nut would be, but I'm not sure about that. I don't see how else it might be held on though. I don't wanna damage it so I'm hoping somebody will confirm that before I start trying to remove it. There's 1 dowel in the adapter that appears to be inserted into one of the 4 bolt holes in the flywheel.
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Assuming that's a Kohler, the flywheel needs a nut or bolt to keep it tight. If that is not there, then the adapter must be the nut.
 

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Here’s an image of the part.
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Don’t see any threads. I think it presses into the the pulley hub. Look through the hole in the bushing and see if there is a nut behind it. The hydro and gear drives take the same flywheel and both are held on by a nut according to the parts lookup. The pulley part is held on by the flywheel nut. It also has an alignment pin that goes into the flywheel. Sometimes it can be a bear to get off.
 

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So, is there a crankshaft bolt under that pilot bearing shown in the picture of post #10 ? Pull that bearing and take a look...(we want pictures!!) There are clearly no threads on the parts in these pictures.

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That year should have a nut. The pulley is left over from narrow frame days with a belt driven hydraulic pump. Cub Cadet continued to use it for driveline adaptation. That bushing is only for drive shaft alignment. My bet is pry that bushing out and there will be a nut holding the pulley and flywheel on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Ding ding ding(y). It was a small one, but a nut nevertheless. Had a thick washer behind it. It was full of grease in there so I couldn't see anything using a flashlight. I used a small screwdriver type probe that has a 90 deg bend on the end. I stuck the probe through the swivel ball hole and did a little test tug. I wasn't even trying to remove it at that point but the bushing unexpectedly plopped out on the bench. I'm not accustomed to things going so easily so it made me a bit nervous wondering what the catch was. Turned out to be the flywheel design.
My bet is pry that bushing out and there will be a nut holding the pulley and flywheel on.
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This shows the backside of the adapter/pulley. It's an odd looking little part.
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I don't get why they didn't just use a 4 bolt stub on the flywheel. Probably a good reason but the way they did it is kinda odd. This flywheel won't work for the use I have in mind without being modified and I don't wanna do that. So I'll either have to not use the engine or use the flywheel from the 140's original engine, assuming the shaft on this K301 engine is the right size.
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
A few other tractor brands apparently used the same flywheel/clutch adapter. At first I thought it was just the IH Cab Cadets. There's actually an 18 HP Kohler twin on FB right now that's the same. I have four one lung vintage K series engines and they're all different. Shaft diameters, lengths, adapter design etc.
 
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