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Discussion Starter #1
I recently restored the dash on my 317. Below are several photos of the before, during and final product.

I want to share my journey and am curious how others have done this same thing.

I am pleased overall with the result with a couple minor exceptions that likely only I will know. It was definitely a labor of love. From a high level, here is a recap of my steps:

  1. Thoroughly scrub with heavy degreaser followed by washing in warm water with dish detergent
  2. Cleaned with rubbing alcohol (I was out of my preferred paint-prep solvent)
  3. Three light coats of flat black clear (about ten minutes in between)
  4. Two light coats of clear (about ten minutes in between)
  5. After allowing it to cure overnight I started in on the silver graphics the next morning. I worked at it for a little more than an hour until my hand became unsteady with the "throttle" graphics.
  6. Later that day I finished the rest of the silver graphics. The larger graphics I could use the pen directly. The smaller graphics required something with a much finer point otherwise the silver paint would bleed way beyond where you want it to. If I were to do this again I would visit a crafts store and pick out a couple very fine point, high quality artists brushes.
  7. I had to go back and touch up a few sloppy areas were the silver paint bled beyond where I wanted it. For this, I sprayed some of the flat black into a small cup and dipped a small brush in the paint to cover up the unwanted silver. Paint out of the can is much thinner than the paint from the marker so this was a bit more challenging. Again, the right brushes might work better.
  8. After allowing the silver paint to cure for 24 hours I gave the entire panel a final clear. This was two very light coats followed by two wet coats to seal everything in. The purpose for this was two-fold: most importantly seal in the silver graphics so they hopefully last a long time, and secondly this blends in the areas I had to touch up with black paint.
Now...time will tell how well this process worked. Most of this I made up as I went along so I would be happy to hear if others have attempted this.

This is what I started with after thoroughly cleaning:

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Here is with the initial flat black and clear coat:

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Final product:

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Supplies:

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Looks great! Will have to bookmark this.
 

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I did just like you did years ago to my 110. Silver paint pen does wonders and a steady hand. I as well clear coated mine to help protect it from the elements and use.
 

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Nice work! Really looks great!
 

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I did the panel for my 317 about 3 years ago and, as stated, a steady hand is helpful. At 70 and years of drinking and smoking, this was not one of my features, SO:

After cleaning, painting black and 2 coats of clear, I set panel aside for 2 weeks and went on with other tasks. During this "paint curing time", I experimented with several processes of applying paint to raised lettering. I ended up using Testor's Model Enamel and a lead pencil eraser. A small puddle of paint was put on an index card, the eraser dipped into the puddle, and excess paint removed by dabbing a clean area of the index card. The raised letters were then dabbed resulting in a light coat on the lettering. Several applications gave me the results I wanted... finally! Even using the eraser with small amounts of paint, I had, 'Uh oh's', but a quick shot of well aimed spray parts cleaner washed them away. The small nozzle, air pressure, and solvent totally removed all white paint and the fully "cured" clear coat protected the black finish. When satisfied with the lettering, 2 coats of clear and:

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Bob
 
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Nice work you guys. Attention to detail like that is the hallmark of a job well done whether it's a dash panel or an entire tractor.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I did the panel for my 317 about 3 years ago and, as stated, a steady hand is helpful. At 70 and years of drinking and smoking, this was not one of my features, SO:

After cleaning, painting black and 2 coats of clear, I set panel aside for 2 weeks and went on with other tasks. During this "paint curing time", I experimented with several processes of applying paint to raised lettering. I ended up using Testor's Model Enamel and a lead pencil eraser. A small puddle of paint was put on an index card, the eraser dipped into the puddle, and excess paint removed by dabbing a clean area of the index card. The raised letters were then dabbed resulting in a light coat on the lettering. Several applications gave me the results I wanted... finally! Even using the eraser with small amounts of paint, I had, 'Uh oh's', but a quick shot of well aimed spray parts cleaner washed them away. The small nozzle, air pressure, and solvent totally removed all white paint and the fully "cured" clear coat protected the black finish. When satisfied with the lettering, 2 coats of clear and:

Bob
Bob -

Yours turned out great! And, whoever cut the hole for the hour meter on your dash did a better job than on mine. Thanks for sharing your story!
 

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Thanks Bob. I cut it but not 100% sure how! I think (??) I laid it out with masking tape marking center and 2" circle. Put it on my drill press with a piece of scrap wood under it and drilled with a 2" hole saw. Bob
 
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