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What does it do?
 

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maybe it needs more beer??? Is the rail scrap counterweight sized for a particular weight operator?
 

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That's cool, but what's the power plant in that truck in the background? What is the truck in the background?

Inquiring minds want to know!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
the little tractor has an old briggs model ZZ. i tried uploading a video of him riding it but it didn't work. the chunk of rail is enough for my 160 lb friend but not for me lol. the truck in the back is a pete 357 with a 60 series disappointment
 

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My uncle Jack built one like that over 50 years ago to mow with. Had a truck transmission and the 9 HP Wisconsin engine out of the Isetta he bought from dad for $50. I'd completely forgotten he ended up with that car till my brother reminded me yesterday. Don't know what happened to the car itself though. It's mentioned in the Random Pics thread.
 

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1976 JD 210, 1988 JD 318, 2 JD 214s, Allis-Chalmers WD45 diesel, Allis-Chalmers WD
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This one has two Ford model A 3 speed transmissions and a Briggs and Stratton 10 Horse engine along with a model A rearend.
 

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Army,

Got any pictures of that Wisconsin that was originally transplanted into that Isetta to replace the factory BMW single? I have been wondering if it had electric start -- or did your Mom just rope start it each time?

Chuck
 

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Army,
Got any pictures of that Wisconsin that was originally transplanted into that Isetta to replace the factory BMW single? I have been wondering if it had electric start -- or did your Mom just rope start it each time?
Chuck
Probably a starter-generator. No pics. That was 57 years ago.
 

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Takes me back to the early 60's when I was working the midnight shift at a paper plant. I learned more working there than any other single place as it had a complete well stocked machine shop, loads of various metal stock and all the tools and hardware you could ask for. We not only fixed fixed, but built a lot of specialty equipment right on site.

During the mid to 8AM shift we had the entire plant to ourselves. The PM manager would leave us a list of things we had to complete and the sooner we were finished the quicker we could get to "home projects". Which by the was was considered a tired shift benefit. And put up with as long as it wasn't ridicule's.

To make a long story short, I made/copied almost everything I could over the years. A complete IH garden tractor, band saws, drill presses, carts, whatever. Some still in use today. A friend has that bandsaw and just won't part with it.

Ah! The good old days.
 

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That sounds like quite the interesting job you had at the paper mill joe.
 
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Yeah I remember being a handsome dude with big muscles back then :p.

Yeah, we did not have camera's back then, just our photographic memories.
 

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N2 - It was actually a corrugated plant. But yes I always had interesting jobs. Ten years in the paper plant, ten years in food plants, (meat processing and bakeries) a couple of years managing an engineering department for a food equipment company, and 15 years in airline management, the best years of my life but that came to a bad ending and the only job that wasn't hands on. (Company had a hostile takeover and several bankruptcies, then a heart attack at 55.) I finished it off operating a Aircraft repair station rebuilding and repairing high performance GA aircraft for ten years. Approx. 2500 hrs. of pilot time and owned several Beech Bonanza's over the years. After the heart attack I lost my medical and that was the end of the flying. At the airline I had direct access to all the flight simulators which often times made a great day care for my then young son. He's now a professional pilot flying the finest of corporate aircraft. And making Dad proud and jealous!

It's truly funny the road life takes you. The repair station started out to be a hobby after an early retirement from the airline. But I let that get out of hand. never let your hobbies evolve into a business!

Now it's just garden tractors and woodworking in the shop. Whichever I feel like doing on any particular day. By the way, the Cub tractor looked more like the photo above than a factory machine. that cast iron front end was beyond my ability. But it worked.
 

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Quite an interesting life story jetjoe. I really like the fight simulator part, awesome dad!
Thanks Tom. I touched upon the positive but with all of us, there was a lot of negative to go with it.

Nuff of that! Back to tractors..

Joe
 

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You obviously like variety Joe. Me too. I was a road dept guy for 10 years, a parks and rec guy for 10 years, then an IT guy for 18 years. Also developed my own software for municipal drain management. Did it on the side for extra income. Between that and working full time and spending time with my family I was always on the go. Not much time for hobbies back then. I'd get up and be in front of a computer working 5 minutes later. Not anymore though. I eventually burned myself out and retired.

But yes I always had interesting jobs.
 

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We're obviously quite alike. Computers were (are) my rainy day, don't feel like it, fall back hobby. Has been since the early eighties. More hardware than software. But I did become quite proficient with most office software. I started playing with AutoCad and ended up using it daily. Both design and engineering. A field I never thought I would ever get into and certainly was never trained for. Started out helping a friend who who owned a very large machine shop in the Minneapolis area who wanted to get into the food plant manufacturing business. Well that turned into a two year stint eventually getting a patent for a food freezer ("apparatus" as those folks call it) that originally would fit into a 53 ft. reefer making it portable. The idea was spurred by a company that sold frozen bread dough. They would back their trailer to one of several large bakeries and conveyor the unbaked loafs directly through the freezer then into packaging. Later, after I moved on the company expanded the system to both freezer and ovens. I went to something much more interesting to me, the airline. But that job (and AutoCad) took me from "hands on" to "suit and tie" which took me twenty years to get out of.

But, that rainy day hobby served me well over the years. I'm looking right now at six computers and two phones which I intend to repair when I once again find or replace my small tools misplaced in the recent move. Perhaps the first rainy day after they arrive. I enjoy fixing them but I too have lost interest in the software side. Just emails and this site nowadays.
 

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Programming is a really cheap interest to have. Other than some development software there's nothing to buy. I like hardware a lot too though. When we moved here almost 17 years ago I had to make two trips to the recycling center with my 4x7 box trailer to get rid of the goodies I had stashed in the basement at our old house. It was all obsolete stuff from work that I couldn't bear to part with.

We had one guy at work that was big on status and had to have a new computer every year. Everybody else was on a 3 year cycle. He was at the director level and the CAO wanted to keep him happy so he told me to accommodate him. Got tired of the silliness of it though so one year I bought him a new tower case and put everything in it from his existing computer. I had to get up and go elsewhere so I could laugh when he started bragging in the lunch room about how fast his new PC was.
 
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