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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Oh I would use a test light to check the two purple wires right? And use the voltmeter to check the battery voltage...
 

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View attachment 270237

Ok cool..what does dvom stand for?
Digital volt, ohm meter. Your Fluke is an excellent tool. Far better than generic cheap toys available everywhere. From your picture, going clockwise from the top:
OFF - Don't forget to turn the meter off after use, otherwise you can kill the batteries inside the meter. And make it a habit of changing them once a year at New Years or your birthday. You don't want leaking batteries to kill a good multimeter.
V with squiggly line - AC Volts or alternating current. House voltage - Not battery voltage
V w/ straight and dashed line - DC Volts or direct current - battery Voltage measurement
Note V means voltage measurement, not current or amps.
300 MV - This is a sensitive range, 300 millivolts. A millivolt is 1/1000th of a volt. This range is very sensitive for measuring small voltages. An example would be to test the flame sensor on an old furnace that used those replaceable thermocouples.
Greek Letter Omega - Ohm measurement. NEVER use this range on a live circuit - i.e. something with voltage. You will blow a fuse inside the meter....or fry the meter.
Diode symbol with sound. This can be used as a continuity tester. If you touch both probes together you will get a buzz or ding dong, or other noise.
A w/ squiggly line - Alternating current AMPS. This measures current flow.
A w/ straight and dashed lines - Direct current AMPS - like from a battery.

I'm not sure what current your meter will measure without a shunt, but typically, these meters do not measure more than 10 amps. Get the manual from Fluke online and read it. You do not want to use this meter for high current flow measurements.

Your meter is, I think, auto ranging. You do not have to set a range, say 1 to 20 volts, then 20 to 60 volts, then 60 to 200. Same for ohms. This is a very nice feature to have.
 

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Oh I would use a test light to check the two purple wires right? And use the voltmeter to check the battery voltage...
I'd suggest using the dvom for the tests. The volt readings are kinda important. They tell the regulator what to do.
When you get it running, check the charge rate at varying throttle settings, including wot. Also with pto engaged, lights on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Which setting will I need to use? It's kind of a different language to me..also do I use this same setting to test all the things I need to test..and should the voltage remain the same at wide open throttle and other throttle settings..and will it remain the same with pto and lights on
 

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You'll be looking to check DC voltage. From your pic of the meter, the leads are connected correctly, the red lead in the red terminal and have to assume the black lead is in the black terminal (not showing in pic). Turn selector knob on meter 2 "clicks" CW and the white dot will point to the V with the straight line and dash lines under that. This represents DC volts. Put red meter lead on positive battery terminal and black lead on negative battery terminal. You should see a number on the screen like 12.7 more or less. This is the present battery voltage and you should record this on a piece of paper to post here later! Next, start & warm engine, and place meter on battery terminals again. Not sure of exact reading, but probably close to your original 12.7. Next go full throttle and measure voltage at battery terminals again. You should see, as Skwirl stated "13.5 to 14.7 volts." Record reading. Still at full throttle, turn lights on, measure battery voltage, and record. Finally, turn pto on, measure battery voltage, and record. Report back here with findings/recorded info:
Battery: xx.x volts
Battery WOT (Wide Open Throttle): xx.x volts
Battery lights on: xx.x volts
Battery pto on: xx.x volts

You can leave lights on when checking voltage with pto on, put please note this. And if lights are turned off, note this also! Someone will follow through with what your findings mean. Bob
 

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The V with the straight line by it.
That setting for this series of tests.
Make sure the battery is charged.
With tractor running at idle or just above, you'll probably see 13.3 or so. With tractor at full throttle, 14.7 volts. With pto engaged and lights on, it may drop a few tenths of a volt, but still be at 14.3.

The other item to check is the glow plug controller. Just to make sure it's off. With tractor running, check for voltage at the glow plug wire.
There shouldn't be any.
 

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Which setting will I need to use? It's kind of a different language to me..also do I use this same setting to test all the things I need to test..and should the voltage remain the same at wide open throttle and other throttle settings..and will it remain the same with pto and lights on
You don't really need to worry about polarity here - i.e. which lead, red or black from the meter goes where. It really makes no difference for what you are doing. If you put the red lead on the ground terminal (-), you will simply get a minus number on the meter, or something like -13.30. Simply disregard the minus sign. The polarity (using the red lead on what you expect to be the positive side in a circuit) can be important for trouble shooting where, if you get that - sign on the meter, it means your circuit board has reversed the polarity - good to know if you are trouble shooting. Otherwise, it is not important.

A little exercise for you, to become familiar with this instrument, would be to run the tests @rwmeyer described in his post #25. Then do exactly the same thing only swap the leads. You should get very similar results. By similar, a 13.42 and a -13.38 are equivalent for our purposes. The only diff here is which lead you used where.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
I got covid it will be at least another day before I can figure the voltage readings.
 

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Covid is nasty. I have been able to evade it but Laurie's family is in the medical profession and it is unbelievable what they go through to protect themselves and still two of them have contacted Covid. Take care and we'll see you back on the seat ... Gabby
 
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Yep I could hardly breathe yesterday morning
Do you have one of those pulse oxymeters? Little gadget docs slip on your finger to check your oxygen level? It's my understanding that when your blod oxygen runs in the very low 90's its time to get thee to a hospital.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
It looks to be wired correctly.
The green wire from harness needs batt voltage when key is on. Remove relay and turn key on, using dvom, check for power at relay terminal for purple wire.
If that's good, then plug relay in, you should hear and feel it click.
Check other purple wire going to regulator. This is your clean voltage from red wire.
This is voltage regulator uses to determine charge rate.

Charge the battery up. Get the tractor running and check the charging voltage. It should be 13.5 to 14.7 volts.
What should the meter read when checking the purple wires?
 

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They will both be battery voltage.

The 1 coming from the tractor harness may be a few tenths of a volt less. Caused by resistance in the connections getting there. Which is what causes a problem.
Your correcting it by supplying direct batt voltage to regulator thru relay.

The purple wire going to regulator needs to read whatever your battery reads for voltage. This is what tells the regulator what to charge batt at.
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
Ok...I charged the battery with no battery cables attached it's at 12.79 volts I did not reattach the battery cables..I'm thinking I should wait at least 4 hours before checking it again to see if the battery drops a significant amount of voltage without the battery cables attached.. correct?
 
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