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Is there local hydraulic shop nearby? They might be able to help or lead you in the right direction.
 

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Nice restoration on the 400. Won't be cheap but you need to contact a hydraulic shop to make the steel lines for you. Probably work best if you took tractor to shop and installed the tubes as they are fabricated so you can tweak them if needed.
 

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Welcome to the group. Now that is some fine restoration work! Please share more details of your efforts. Did you replace all the backhoe cylinders? I do not recall how my loader hard lines are made, but will have a look tomorrow to see if there are alternatives to those with the 90 degree double ends.
Harold
 

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I too would like to know how the lines are made. I brought my lines to a hydraulic shop and they said the 4 lines would be over 1000$ to make. Thier prices are normal for regular stuff (25$ for pressure washer line). I was thinking about buying the steel line, taking original blocks and drilling them out and brazing the new line into them. I was successful in brazing some pinholes in my lines. Beautiful machine!!
 

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I wonder if those double ends are 'silver soldered' to the tubes? I don't see any brazing buildup where the tube meets the connector. Silver solder does not build up like braze does, it gets sucked into the joint.

I brought my lines to a hydraulic shop and they said the 4 lines would be over 1000$ to make
At that price it sounds like the shop did not want anything to do with your project!
 

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If there is a hydraulic supply company near you, I’m sure they can do it. Thankfully there is one within 10 minutes from us


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If you're desperate , you could buy a cheap flaring tool and tubing bender and try it yourself. Made some myself some years ago for a power steering conversion I did. Not as hard as you might think. Check out YouTube?
 

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If there is a hydraulic supply company near you, I’m sure they can do it. Thankfully there is one within 10 minutes from us


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Not sure that is true. XXXXXXXXXXX Hose and Hydraulic stopped doing cylinder seal replacement work because of cost and low work volume. I am sure they are like :"Mickey D's" they need their employees to make $100/hr.

My model 44 is going to need some steel line work but I should be able to straighten the lines with a forming tool. I do not have kinks in the line like Rob has.
 

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Yeah I brought a cylinder in and they don’t replace seals anymore but they recommended somebody good. but they are still making lines at this store because we’ve gotten some there for my tractor. I’m not sure that they do metal lines like that but I’ve never asked. Some strong rubber ones would maybe work


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I made some steel brake lines for one of my cars recently, it was the first time I used a flaring tool. I bought enough pipe that I could do some 'practice runs' before the real thing to get a feel for the process. After a few practice joints it was not too difficult.
 

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Discount hydraulic hose has compression fittings that work with 3/8" steel brake line,I had good luck with this so far. Nice looking machine
 

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Nice job on the restoration. Now to the hydraulic lines. It looks like someone was trying to reinvent the wheel. Maybe I'm missing something. Maybe they absolutely had to be made that way. Don't know. If I were to make them, I would use flareless fittings. Use a T fitting to replace the inline fitting. Using fittings that require flaring just creates more work. Where I work, we use flareless fittings almost exclusively, many times on systems going over 5000 psi.
 

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Welcome to the site. Great looking machine. Again. too nice to use. I think Tom is correct with the silver solder. That's what use to be used for this type of assembly, much like refrigeration tubing. You may try an A/C shop for this work. But I'm sure there are newer techniques and alloys. But if so, you may be able to disconnect those fitting with a torch and reuse them.
 

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Problem with hydraulic hose is routing. What I mean is following bend recommendations. You could use hoses and 90° fittings but I would be concerned about pressure drops when doing this. Hydraulic expert will need to confirm this.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Wow! Thank you guys for all your post! I’m new to this form and I’m sorry i did not join sooner but only recently found out about this. I really appreciate all the support! As for the lines, there are no crazy bends, I know the tubes look like that but I guess over the years they have been bent up for whatever reason. The only tubes that have a curve in them is the ones pictured because they follow the loader arms. The bends I can do with no problem. Iv been to almost every hydraulic shop near me and no one can replicate my lines. I guess no one does steel tube work. I have reached out to companies all over the States and most of them can’t do them or they want hundreds made at a time. I do believe someone said about A/C soldering? I’m most definitely sure that is correct, I do not see any build up of brazing. The joints are clean almost as if they just snapped together of course I know that is not the case. I ordered some 3/8 tubing and gonna try to make the lines myself. My question is I would just heat the ends and the fittings should slide off? Also when I solder them back on what do I use for solder? Is it the same as plumbing or electrical work?? Thanks guys!!
 

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I believe the steel lines are cheaper in manufacturing and they are more durable than a flexible hose. And, they look so darned good when done right, prefect bends, held tight the framework, etc, kinda like artwork.
 
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If they used silver solder you should be able to separate the fitting using a torch. Most refrigeration techs use Acetylene. It's virtually identical to brazing or soldering. I'm fairly confident an A/C shop could help you out with the tube, solder, and most likely new fittings if necessary. At least that's the direction I would look at this stage.

I would try to replicate what you have rather go down the hose/fitting route. The quality of your work so far deserves that.
 
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