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I'll bet you could heat them and pull them apart. Silver soldering is straight forward and an easily acquired skill with a bit of practice. When I was working, we did it all the time making artifact mounts in the museum. YouTube will be a good resource. It will be more akin to jewelry work. Nice, nice, nice 400 btw!
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
I'll bet you could heat them and pull them apart. Silver soldering is straight forward and an easily acquired skill with a bit of practice. When I was working, we did it all the time making artifact mounts in the museum. YouTube will be a good resource. It will be more akin to jewelry work. Nice, nice, nice 400 btw!
Thank you very much !!
 

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She's a real looker! Fantastic restoration. There's some real great advice here from this forum! Does the seat swivel to use the backhoe? I noticed the seat springs are in a different orientation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
She's a real looker! Fantastic restoration. There's some real great advice here from this forum! Does the seat swivel to use the backhoe? I noticed the seat springs are in a different orientation.
Thank you ! Yes it’s been a fun resto! Working on the loader as we speak.. should be done soon. Yes the seat does swivel and locks in 1 of seven positions. I reverse the original seat springs in order for the perfect fit for the swivel seat
 

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Silver soldering is not difficult, however it does require higher temps than tin/lead or antimony/tin solder. You can easily learn how, but I'd suggest practicing on some scrap metal first. By the time you buy the solder and flux, you will probably spend $20 bucks or so, and for this application, I'd find a frienly refrigeration shop if you can. You seemed to indicate you were headed in that direction.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Silver soldering is not difficult, however it does require higher temps than tin/lead or antimony/tin solder. You can easily learn how, but I'd suggest practicing on some scrap metal first. By the time you buy the solder and flux, you will probably spend $20 bucks or so, and for this application, I'd find a frienly refrigeration shop if you can. You seemed to indicate you were headed in that direction.
I actually went out today to try and spin the fittings off. So I started out with a bottle of Map gas, small throw away tanks you buy at Home Depot or hardware stores. Heated the fittings up an they all spun right off. So everyone was right they are silver solder. I did purchase flux and a roll of solder made for metal and pipe, Not plumbing or Electrical . I’m still practicing a little with it on some old pieces. Do you or anyone have any tips, I know cleaning all pieces are critical, but do you put flux on first than the fitting on followed by solder and then wipe with flux after solder?
 

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I silver soldered alum to brass and steel to brass. I applied the flux paste to both pieces then applied heat. When the flux turns to liquid you apply the solder. You need relatively tight-fitting clean joints for the solder to wick into.
 
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Unless we have an expert here who is willing to tutor you, I suggest you do some reading and research. A quick look (google search for 'silver solder' yielded: (Some repeat what the others say, but Q and A's provide what I think are valuable information. - specifically the 3rd link in the first question.)

Here is a youtube video that shows the basic technique. I liked the guy's accent. Other videos on the topic follow.


I also knew from before that there are different mixes of 'silver solder' - some contain lead, some do not. For a high pressure application like yours, I think you should know what the options are and their applications.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Unless we have an expert here who is willing to tutor you, I suggest you do some reading and research. A quick look (google search for 'silver solder' yielded: (Some repeat what the others say, but Q and A's provide what I think are valuable information. - specifically the 3rd link in the first question.)

Here is a youtube video that shows the basic technique. I liked the guy's accent. Other videos on the topic follow.


I also knew from before that there are different mixes of 'silver solder' - some contain lead, some do not. For a high pressure application like yours, I think you should know what the options are and their applications.
Thank you Tracfan for the info- I appreciate it. Iv been doing a lot of research on it over the last week so I have a pretty good idea, not to hard to do at all. Gonna give it a try, but Whenever I’m unsure of a job I always reach out to a number of sources to get everyone’s opinion or experience , thanks again !
 

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I have done silver soldering on copper refrigerant line sets. To me it wasn't much different than soldering plumbing copper. When it is just right the solder will suck right into the joints. But the steel may require a higher or lower temperature. Practice... You can do this!
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
I have done silver soldering on copper refrigerant line sets. To me it wasn't much different than soldering plumbing copper. When it is just right the solder will suck right into the joints. But the steel may require a higher or lower temperature. Practice... You can do this!
Thanks! Yes the lines came out good, I just finished them up. I’ll have to post a few pictures next time I’m in the shop- thanks again for the help !
 
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