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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is not my tractor, but I have been given the task of repairing, reassembling, and get it running. It belongs to a cousin who got it when his dad passed away. His dad, my uncle, had torn it down for repairs after the fan shaft came loose and ate the radiator. This happened decades ago, and the tractor has been sitting in my cousins shop ever since. We towed this to our shop about a year ago with the understanding that it would be a no rush job. The hard part with this job is most of the bolts are spread all over my cousins shop so I will need to a lot of searching to identify what goes where. Fun, Fun, Fun!!!!

I tore the radiator apart just after bringing the tractor over last year and started cleaning parts in the e-tank. Also pulled the governor housing off that already had the gears removed. The last couple days I started cleaning up the governor housing, disassembling the governor shaft to install new bearings, and cleaned up the top of the crankcase where the governor mounts. Figured I should spray some paint for him while this is accessible before reassembly starts. Anyway, this is a start, and we will see how it goes. I made a video slide show with some of the pics I have taken so far.

 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Since I got myself a borescope, I figured I should pull the plugs and take a look inside this engine since its been sitting in a damp shop for decades. Looks like the rodents got in the open exhaust and intake ports and brought some seeds and other debris with them. The bores look a bit rusty and could use some cleaning and I would like to get a good look at the valves to see if the rodent piss has pitted the face of the valves and seats. I would like to pull the head but need to ask my cousin if he wants me to go that far. I see it as this would be the time to do it since its already torn down to this point. Just need a head gasket. The pics show the rust in the bores, carbon laying in the bottom, debris on an open valve, and rust in the combustion chamber in the head. The last 3 pics are one down an exhaust port thats completely filled with rust and the 2 intake valves with the mouse goodies in them.

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1951 JD B, 1967 JD 110-Rf, 1969 JD 110-Sf custom, 1972 JD 110-Sf
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Interesting how fast something can get over taken by critters and in the smallest of spots. My farm sat empty for about 5 years. The shop had a lot rodent condos around. I had a hard time shifting my atv into gear and there were walnuts crammed in between the shifting linkage and around the engine. Anytime I opened up a cabinet or swept up a pile of saw dust mice would scatter. It took a good farm cat and a year of constant activity in the shop to finally drive them out.
 

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I would pull head and clean every thing. I would also pull all valves from head and polish/clean valves and seats. Make sure they move freely in guides. If you’re not going to use tractor or work it hard, a good cleaning of cylinders will be sufficient. Rings will probably be stuck even if engine isn’t. I would probably remove pistons as well and get them unstuck
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
A little more investigating and I found a mouse nest in the water jacket of the block right between the 2 cylinders. This is looking down into the big rectangular opening on the block in the last pic.

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Finished cleaning up the governor shaft and gears. I used the bead blasting cabinet to remove the light rust on the gears and the shaft is now ready for assembly. The 2 shaft bearings will be replaced, and the thrust bearing is good with just a lite cleaning. I already have the governor housing stripped and ready for primer so I moved on to the fan shaft and managed to get most of it stripped of paint. Should be able to finish it up tomorrow so it can be primed also.

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
And what's the vig for cousin in all this, for all your good work?
I had to look up VIG as I am unfamiliar with that term. We are horse trading some tractor parts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Just got back in from pulling the head. The shop is cold, 36°F on the old thermometer, and I didn't want to waste wood and propane for 1/2 hour of work. Glad I pulled it with all of the crud in the cylinders and ports. A lot of it is carbon, but also quite a bit of rust granules. Big pile of rust came out of the exhaust port when I turned the head over. It was stacked up against the exhaust valve where could have easily fallen into the cylinder if you turned it over. Everything I see so far should clean up pretty easily and I just need to pull the valves to check out the seats and faces.

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Definitely need to remove pistons and rings, hone cylinders after seeing what you have in pictures. Rings could possibly be cleaned and reused. Definitely make sure they move freely in pistons. Carbon and rust can build up in ring lands and prevent ring’s from sealing properly. You can also check crank to rod clearance’s before removing them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I got the shop warmed up a little and thought I would see if I could clean the rust out of the cylinders. After rolling the engine over I found the rust was limited to the area above where the pistons had stopped in the bores. I decided to try some Ospho on a shop towel and some scotch brite. It worked great, cutting thru the rust with ease. After cleaning I wiped it all down and shot a good coating of WD-40. This will all get a good cleaning before assembly starts. I also sucked up the big mouse nest in the water jacket. It was bigger than I thought. I then moved to the head to start removing valves. First valve I tried is stuck. This is an exhaust valve that had all of the rust and debris in the port. I'll get some penetrant on it and see if It will loosen up without any damage. I think it will if I take my time. Probably a good thing that I didn't roll the engine over before I took it apart or I might have bent a pushrod.

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
With the pile of rust poured out of the exhaust port I sprayed some WD-40 down the port last night hoping it would coat the valve stem that you can't see. Today I took my borescope out to see what the valve stem looks like. Not Good. I put some acetone/ATF mix on it so we will see if that works down between the valve and guide. Hopefully the rust didn't go up the guide to far.

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The exhaust valves will be a hardened material and should clean up nicely. The intake are not, they will suffer damage from the rust and may need replaced. My 1937 A was in a ditch for years. I salvaged it and saved exhaust valves but had to buy new intake valves. Kroil is a good penetration oil for rust. Patientence can be a good thing with rust.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Well, we have the first casualty in this project. After many attempts trying to get this valve out it finally started moving but got really tight again. While trying to push it back the valve head snapped off. Must not have had things squared up. Anyway, with the damage already done, I got the stem pushed out. Lots of dry looking rust in the guide. Probably need to get both the valve and guide but I will clean it up first to see what shape the guide is in.

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Wire brushed the valve seats. The bad exhaust valve seat looks a little rough, but I think it will clean up. The other exhaust seat has a little pitting that will clean up just fine. The 2 intakes look nice. The pics in order are bad exhaust, intake, intake, and exhaust.

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I checked our inventory and I needed to get some larger pilots and stones. Got those ordered and they should be here in the next day or 2. We also picked up a Sioux 645L valve refacer last year that needed some TLC. My dad and brother spent some time on it over the weekend getting the chuck loosened up and a general cleaning. We are approaching test time for it, just waiting on the cutting oil that is also in the order.

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
While cleaning the cylinders out I noticed little to no bore wear. After closer inspection I found aluminum pistons with .125 stamped into them. This tractor must have been rebuilt shortly before my dad and uncle picked it up.

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