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Discussion Starter #1
Well, it's too cold to do anything else and having procrastinated long enough, here's the new thread. Like most of you, I'm not a factory trained Kawasaki tech., so use this at your own risk. And don't be bashful pointing out any mistakes if you see one!
That said, I'm using component manual CTM39 (OCT93). I hope there is a newer revision as this one has some errors, mostly in metric to inch conversions.
As always, take lots of pictures as you remove the engine and disassemble components. You will be rewarded as you put things back right where they belong. Here's a sample:

(This is a re-do as first attempt was during the pic. upload problem time.)
tommyhawk

(Message edited by tommyhawk on February 12, 2007)
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Leave the radiator support brackets on this vertical shaft engine as they make an excellent stand for disassembling the crankcase halves. If it broke before replacement, expect to find lots of little plastic pieces. I used a shop vac to get everything visible. Used a small mirror to look up in the pistons, etc., blew it out with air hose, checked again, and again, then crossed my fingers.
(pieces)

Oil pump and gov. gear have no visible damage, but will be replaced.
(o/p-gov)

Check for worn spot on gov. arm. Polish that out or replace it.
(arm)

t.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The gov. gear is a one shot deal so if you remove it, it must be replaced with a new one. The wood helps to prevent damage to the crankcase surfaces, but be careful however you do this part.
(removal)

Here's a blurry pic. of the gear from a 285. The sleeve was badly worn and was about .050" shorter than the new one. It had fewer hours than the 320, but was worn more! Curious? The washer under the gear had worn half way thru. At about $8.00 for a washer, gear, and sleeve, I've decided to always replace them.

t.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The broken pieces should not be able to get past the oil pump screen. I did find a flaw in the casting that got whittled out of there with a sharp chisel, don't want that to ever come loose and enter the oil pump.
(slag)

The o/p gear looked perfect, but for about $4 bucks, seemed wise to replace it. It is not under the same stress as the cam, but subject to fatigue.
The oil pressure relief spring exceeded the minimum free length spec., but did not reach all the way to the pump plate. This made me nervous, but let it go to see what happened. Hind site tells me to get a new spring and check this out to be sure. Oil pressure could be checked with a gage substituted for the sending unit. The warning light worked as it should, before and after repair, but the sending unit had to be replaced because it leaked.
(o/p)


t.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
A new gov. and used one.
(gov.)

Both of these engines had the gov. shaft protruding above the limit specified. (shaft)

This is probably just coincidence, but with a new washer installed, the measurement was just about in the limit. The book shows the measurement to the block without the washer.
(meas.)

Made this aluminum sleeve to assure I didn't tap it in too far. It is a piece of aluminum with a .28 hole to clear the 6.0mm shaft and the length specified in the manual for the shaft to protrude.
(tool)

The gov. gear has some free-play in the groove in the shaft. Be nice to know the correct amount, but as long as it sits on the washer and can move up a little in the retaining groove, I think it's good to go.

t.
 

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Excellent photos and documentation. I sure hope our picture posting capabilities hold out until you get this repair finished and fully documented.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Here's the little tool, in place, to keep from tapping the shaft in too far. When the ol' hammer touches it, stop.


t.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Be sure to get these "o" rings new if you don't need the complete rebuild gasket set. Also replace the lower crankshaft seal.
(rings)

This shows the new cam and timing marks aligned. It is highly recommended to also replace the tappets with a new cam, no matter how good they look. To remove the old cam, it must be in this position with the valve pushrods and fuel pump pushrod removed, then it will just lift out. With the busted cam, ya might have a little trouble finding the mark though!
(marks)


t.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
With this many engine hours, and a 13 year old machine, it gets a new water pump, too. There was a kit listed, that would have taken care of the broken gear, but had no price. The cover does not come with the pump. If it is not badly corroded, reuse it, but lap the mounting surface just as you would a Kohler head.
(lap)

Some covers will have a threaded plug in the area shown. Guess it would be a drain plug, but not accessible on a 320 or 285. This cover doesn't have one. The 285 did, though.
(plug)

Careful with the w/p bolts. There are 2 diameters and different lengths. They will all stick up about the same amount when in their proper holes. Manual doesn't give much help on tightening pattern, so I just use the standard criss-cross to include the case bolts and the w/p bolts until the 69 in. lb. torque is obtained for the small w/p bolts. Then continue in 50 in.lb. increments on the larger bolts until reaching the recommended torque on them.
(bolts)

Now reinstall pushrod and fuel pump. Then the valve pushrods and set valve lash while on the bench, much easier there. Recheck the lash after rotating engine several times.

t.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Guess that's it. I did leave out a lot of the complete repair, and so will the manual. It's really pretty easy if you have the manual and some prior experience with small engines. You need some tools, or access to someone who does, to check for wear on reusable original parts. With these two engines, I found no wear or other damage to the case, crankshaft, cylinders, or pushrods. Hope they always come out this way!
One other thing, the engine block on the 320 had threaded mounting holes. On the 285 the mounting holes did not have threads, instead it had longer bolts with nuts. So, if the bolts are corroded to the holes and you rip out the threads, just drill out all 4 holes for clearance and get the longer bolts with nuts. The right rear bolt will have a nut for fastening the ground cables even if threaded into the block. With clearance holes, 2 nuts are required.

tommyhawk
 
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