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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking at a very used 420. It has serious problems with the deck but looks like it was only used for mowing. I doubt if routine work was done, and it was patched as needed. It has had no weight, still paint in drawbar hole. It has a rear pto and 3pt hitch and they both look unused. The deck is used up and major repair is necessary. The meter shows over 2100 hours and the owner brought it to JD when something had to be done. My problem, how many hours should I expect out of this engine?
It is a lot more tractor than my 317, but it sounds terrible. all input is appreciated
 

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Jerry,

Just buy it for parts so you can sell me the pto and 3-point hitch.


Engine sounds like it may be used up as mine went for 2100 hours and then I swapped in a 25HP Kohler. Sold the old engine on the e-sight.

If you don't buy it I will!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Jim, I think it is a buy, I just have so much going on it may have to set awhile. I am not finished with the 4x6 317, and while the corn burner is working well, again I am not finished.
Looks like I will have to install duct and blower to get the hot air to the back of the house. Also, I have another corn cart to build.
The problem with retirement is there is NEVER a day off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Lloyd, this is all on another link with photos and everything. I am sending you to the first page and if you follow it, there are others. I am trying to keep everyone up on the whole thing.
If you don't get this I will send private email with connecting links......... Jerry
 

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I am trying bring back to life a 2001 445 that has been sitting for a long time. The hour meter says 330 hrs which looks to be correct, but the machine sat parked because the transmission was bad. Compression is 220 and 205 which seems to be good, but the problem is both left and right intake valves stick badly. Before I can start it, I need to take off the valve covers and tap on the valves and slowly work them loose. Then it will start up and run fine, but if I turn it off and the motor cools, the valves will lock up again. I have had to do this 6 or 7 times, and it is not improving. I have dumped "Mystery" oil in the engine oil, I have run Lucas injector cleaner in the fuel, but it does not seem to be getting better. Any suggestions as to why the valves keep freezing up? I do not want to pull the head off if I don't have to.
 

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I think you are going to have to remove the heads to find the problem. Maybe slightly oversized valves that were replaced at one time and the guides need to be reamed for proper clearance. I personally would take the heads into a reputable engine builder and have them looked as assuming that oil is getting up to the the heads. Is there plenty of oil under the valve covers when they are removed? This is a mechanical problem and no cure in a bottle is going to help. Roger
 

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This is a common problem with gasoline engines that have been started and run with stale fuel.
"Sitting for a long time" suggests that is your situation. The problem is varnish on the valve guides and stems. If running some penetrating oil down the stems and working the valves free won't clear it up, you'll have to pull the valves out and clean mechanically. The problem is that the varnish melts when the engine gets hot, then sets up again when it cools.

Plan on pulling the heads and doing a good valve job on things. Wire brushing the valves and ports, check the valve springs for weakness, and reseat the valves. To clean the guides, an "egg beater" mechanical cleaner does a fine job. Check the guide-stem clearances.

There's a point where "do it right---or not at all" is the only answer. Mouse milks won't solve the problem. A good automotive machine shop can handle all the work once you pull the heads.

(As an aside, a couple of us are going to pull a 1949 Cadillac out of a barn, that has been sitting there since 1997. It will get flat-bedded to where we can work on it, and no attempt will be made to start it until we've pulled and cleaned and fuel tank and flushed the fuel system.)
 

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Thank you for the responses, and that is kind of what I was suspecting. I did clean the tank before I initially started it, but I did not flush out the fuel line or change the inline filter. I had been working the valves loose and spraying carb cleaner ( which has been great at dissolving "varnish") down the valve stems to get them to a point where they are perfectly free, but they continue to freeze up after the engine has been run and allowed to cool down. Would it necessarily need a valve job or just a mechanical cleaning to get rid of all the varnish? It still has great compression. What is an "egg beater" mechanical cleaner for the valve guides?
 

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Kim, the valve guide cleaning tool I'm thinking of looks something like a reamer, but has spring steel blades. Actually, rifle barrel cleaning tools work here as well. I have one of these tools, but it's probably from the 1930's.

Acetone, as a solvent, generally cuts old fuel varnish. However, when the acetone evaporates, the varnish sets up again. You have to flush it out. The solvents you are using have this problem.

In general, you're going to have to take the heads off and remove the valves to clean the stems and guides. If you're going that far, a complete valve reconditioning isn't that much more work. If the valve faces and seats are still good, just lap them in before reassembling to assure you've got good seating.
 
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