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Beet Juice (rim guard) is high density and adds more weight to wheels than water/antifreeze. I added rim guard to my 332 with loader along with a starter weight and double notch cast iron on each wheel. Two problems. First you need to put rimguard in your retirement plan because it is quite expensive. Second it was a waste of money on a tractor with CTC loader. Loader uses tractor hydraulics and has limited lift capacity. I plan to add a dedicated hydraulic system to fix this problem.

$102 parts and labor to fill two 23x10.5-12 tires with beet juice.

Link gives weight for rimguard filled wheels ... 1987 332 w/loader ... Southwest Wisconsin
I have used the Rimguard. It is denser and it doesn't freeze. The downside is that if you develop a leak it is a gooey sticky mess. After the Rimguard I found another similar product made from corn. A tire shop that handles ag tires and repairs had it.
 

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Do you have a name for it and cost?
 

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Yes how does the corn stuff hold up and is it proprietary dealer only stuff like the beet juice is?
 

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I don't know where this should be posted, so moderator feel free to move it. I plan to use windshield washer fluid in my tires. I just scored enough to do 2 tractors at my local Walmart. They are selling off the -20 degree gallons for $0.71 each. Went on sale yesterday, I think.
Washer fluid isn't really a good way to go because of the alcohol content drying out the rubber and causing dry rot. Walmart sells a bio degradible antifreeze for RV water systems that goes to -50* below. I mixed a freezer bag of this with 50 %antifreeze and 50 % water and put it in my freezer @ -5* for a week. Result was it got kinda slushy but not at all frozen solid. Even slushy it would reliquify in minutes just driving around and it won't dry rot your tires. Also, if you drill your rim and install a second tubeless tire valve 180 degrees, directly across from the original tire valve and remove both valve cores, you can gravity fill the tires in a fraction of the time as the tire fills from the bottom valve and vents air out the top valve.
 

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I use inner tubes in all my tires that are fluid filled so I would have to assume my tubes are exposed to the alcohol but my tires are not. I have seen too many rims rusted/rotted from exposure to fluid fill (chloride). I will look into price of RV antifreeze vs windshield washer fluid ... Gabby
 

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Very interesting info on fluid filled tires. Does the fluid fill affect the ride quality as in make it more harsh? You know, like how squishy (tech term) the tires are?
 

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These are garden tractors Tom, not Cadillas. You are only traveling a couple miles/hour most of the time. Ride on a garden tractor is affected by other factors like ground condition, tire pressure, and seat suspension. The only thing I see is my tractors will now go where no man has gone before.
 

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Very interesting info on fluid filled tires. Does the fluid fill affect the ride quality as in make it more harsh? You know, like how squishy (tech term) the tires are?
If anything they improve ride at times as the prevent the rear ending from bouncing into the air.
 

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"bouncing into the air"? You are operating at to high of speed if you have issue with bouncing off seat. Do you have roll over protection and 3 point safety harness installed on your tractor? You need to spend more time in the garage working on your tractor and less time sitting in front of computer whining about imaginary problems.

These vintage tractors are not Zero Turn mowers which do operate at higher speeds.
 

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The liquid WW fluid ballast in my 430 rear tires keeps me grounded and does improve traction when ditching. That's all the 430 does, plus move stuff around with the Johnny Bucket Sr. But my ground is sandy loam so I have to ease into movement, F or R, or I put those heavier bar tires in the ground. Also put a cheapo HF winch on the front, so I can drag that beast out if I get stupid enough to stick it.
Had the WW fluid as ballast for at least 3 years now and don't see any cracking/wear/etc. on the rear tires yet...they are, however, heavy as sin when you need to get one off...even after I pull the weights off the rims. Ah, to be young again with the brain I have now!
 

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"bouncing into the air"? You are operating at to high of speed if you have issue with bouncing off seat. Do you have roll over protection and 3 point safety harness installed on your tractor? You need to spend more time in the garage working on your tractor and less time sitting in front of computer whining about imaginary problems.

These vintage tractors are not Zero Turn mowers which do operate at higher speeds.
Bouncing into the air was a slight exaggeration but the ride improves due to better ground hugging characteristics.
And that’s also coming from running across hay fields with a CUT where speed = productivity and is required for ground drive rakes to work well. (The ride is dramatically worse without a heavily ballasted rear end, get to experience this whenever the fork frame is on without ballast barrel, and the 317 + 54 blade is the same)
So a well ballasted rear axle improves the ride quality in my opinion.
So not whining about imaginary problems but sharing my experiences.
 
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Discussion Starter #32
The original post was for a good deal on -20 windshield washer fluid at Walmart at $0.71 per gallon. They are probably sold out by now.

The most common rubber used on the inside of tires is butyl rubber. It's cheap and easy to work with. The main component of windshield washer fluid is methanol. Methanol has very little affect on butyl rubber. Other types of rubber may experience softening or swelling per the rubber industry chemical resistance tables.
 

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I filled the tires on my 140 several years ago with windshield washer solution I got on sale and have not had any problems at this point. Since I don't have tubes, I broke the bead on one side and just poured it in until it was full and applied pressure to pop the bead into place. I think I got about 8 gallons into each tire.
Only question is what kind of gauge do you use to check the air pressure since most of them quit after a good shot of washer solution?
 

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I filled the tires on my 140 several years ago with windshield washer solution I got on sale and have not had any problems at this point. Since I don't have tubes, I broke the bead on one side and just poured it in until it was full and applied pressure to pop the bead into place. I think I got about 8 gallons into each tire.
Only question is what kind of gauge do you use to check the air pressure since most of them quit after a good shot of washer solution?
They make a tire gauge for this very purpose. I have one.Tractor tire gauge
 

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Another curious specialty tool...where do you get one?
John Deere dealer.is where I got mine. But eBay, Amazon, auto parts store may have them.
 
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