Weekend Freedom Machines banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
1976 JD 214H
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Did the tailgate rear corners 3/8" x 2" cap screws on a Model 80 Dump Cart have a square shank below the bolt head that fits in the square corner opening? I have vintage, I believe 1968 cart and it appears that the shank below the bolt should be square. The last time I used this cart was about 20 years ago when I removed the tailgate to load an air compressor to move it out to my lawn irrigation system for maintenance. I removed the rear corner cap screws to remove the tailgate and for the life of me find the cap screws that came with the cart. JD has them available but it does not describe the cap screw, only the size.

Thanks,

James

268417
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
498 Posts
The ones in mine are just a regular bolt
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,816 Posts
Sounds like a plain ol' carriage bolt available at any hardware, farm supply or box store. Bob
268422
 

·
Registered
John Deere 400
Joined
·
116 Posts
The ones specified in the catalog are just hex head. They are not a carriage bolt with a square shank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
183 Posts
My carts are standing up in the back of the garage and are a bit buried. They were hard to see but the bolts holding the tailgate were indeed hex head bolts. I could not see any hex nuts under the rim but if I recall correctly, isn't the tailgate 90 degree elbow threaded and the hex bolts just thread into the elbow piece?

You shouldn't need to go to the dealer to get these bolts. I'm guessing they are standard threads. Take a bolt out of the front corner of the trailer (if your trailer has bolts in the front corner) and see if it fits in the tailgate. If so, go to a hardware store and buy 2 bolts the correct length for the tailgate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Original bolts were 3/8-16 x 2” hex head, with a lock washer-aka ‘split washer’.
This cart looks to be in great shape. May not need this: I’d recommend chasing the threads before running the bolts in. Apply a little paint after chasing them and use some anti-seize. There is a nut, tack welded, to a little 90 degree strap under the bolt hole. If the bolt gets seized in the nut or forcing a new bolt in a rusted nut, it’s real easy to break.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top