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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a parts 140 that has been laying around for some time. I have a new 16 hp Kohler engine that I want to put in it. The problem is the Kohler is a newer engine with the flat oil pan and the crank is about 2 inches higher than the original Kohler.

It looks like the easiest way to get the drive shaft to line up is to cut the frame in two where the original diagonal weld is just in front of the brake pedals and weld in a couple plates to raise the rear end two inches.



I would have to modify the hood, hydraulic lines, and add about two inches to the steering arm. It looks do-able.

My question is can I get tires for the rear that would raise the rear end by two inches?? What size tire would give me that amount on standard rims?
 

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Richard -

How are things!

I can't help you with this one, but after seeing a lot of your work first hand, I know this will be a treat when it is done!

The 14HP Oil pan won't fit on the bottom of the 16HP engine?

-Chris
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Chris, No the Kohler block is different, it is probably one of the last single cylinder 16 hp engines they built, it has the solid state ignition.

By the way I have another 140 but it is up in Montana and I need to get it down here and get it registered. It's got a really good mower deck and tiller for it.
 

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Richard

You know what you have as it is in front of you.
However I just installed a K341 out of a 216 into a 140 just yesterday.
Crank height on mine was the same and the oil pan swapped over without any issues.
Obviously you are working with a different 16 hp Kohler than I was.

AJ
 

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different k series and magnum kohlers have different oil pans.some have the ears on the blocks to change pans and some dont,most dont.the 200 series deeres are an exception to the rule.they have the deere style pan that they use but they also have the ears cast into them that lets the block except a wheel horse style pan for example.i learned this stuff the hard way doing engine swaps.another interesting side note,there are 5 different kohler heads for the big block 10-14 horse power engines.the moral of this story is just because you have 2 kohler big block cast iron single cylinder engines sitting side by side out of different tractors dont mean the engines are identicle.(the heads will interchange,they have different combuston chambers and different thickness bolt bosses etc.)
 

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Good to know Jim.
The ears you spoke of were on the block of the 216 K341 engine.
I simply ground them smooth to get them to clear the hydro lines.
So I f I had one out of a 300 or 316 it would have the ears on the oil pan?
Therefore not allowing the oil pans to swap?

AJ
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Here is the engine I plan on using, it is a Kohler Mag-16S.



You can see the base is much wider and deeper.



I really want to use this engine as it has been sitting around waiting for a chance to work. It is brand new, never had oil in it yet.

I looked at it again today and did some more measurements. It looks like I will only be off about 1 1/4 inches but I think that is too much for the drive shaft.

It looks like John Deere built the front frame in one piece and the rear was just welded on, so it should be pretty easy to cut it apart at that point and just raise the rear end the 1 1/4 inches and weld it back together with a plate and the drive shaft should be straight. The hood and the steering should be pretty easy too.
 

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thats pretty much it AJ the 300 series wont have the ears on the block.as you can see on Richards two different blocks in the above post the magnum has the ears to mount the deep pan but the k series engine next to it doesnt have the ears so you cant switch the pans on it.on the 200 series engines they use the ears to mount the engine,so the blocks are the only john deere kohlers that i know of that will take either the swallow john deere pan or the deeper pan as shown above,which as i mentioned before will bolt to most wheel horse frames.
 

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Thanks for the lesson Jim and the pictures Richard.
I never knew that.
Good luck Richard.

AJ
 

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AJ dont know if im qualified to give lessons but i will pass on the info i have learned over the years.Richard,if you want to raise the rear 2 inches i=you will need tires that are 4 inches taller than stock.the stock tires were rated at 23 inches tall.the 26 12 12's would get you real close.have you made any design progress one the frame/engine?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Jim I still need to get some tires on the 140 to get it mobile and then I will pull the old engine and set the Mag in place and see exactly how much clearance I need.

On the design I can see that it would be almost impossible to do anything with the front part of the 140. Too much heavy steel with the front axle and steering all part of the front frame. The engine will have to sit on the flat part of the frame.

Once the new engine is in place I will have a better idea how much the drive shaft will be off. With the measurements I have made so far it looks like the front will be approximately 1 1/4 inches higher.

I could look at using universal joints on the front and the rear ends of the drive shaft. I don't know how much of a problem that would be with the balance of the shaft.

I could cut the frame apart where it was originally welded just in front of the brakes and then raise the rear part until the drive shaft is straight and then weld in a couple of plates.

I haven't had a fun project for some time so this one has me interested.
 

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Richard, I had a similar problem when I replaced the 14 horse with a 16 horse on my 140, when I removed the larger pan from the 16 I noticed that the pan from the 14 would fit. the only modification that had to be done was to tap out the holes for mounting the 14 pan.

Later, I found another 14 with the large pan and was again going to swap to a 140 and discovered this time that the block was machine slightly different. The 'ears' were cut to accept a plug or dipstick. Thus the pan would not seal to the block. It fit other wise.

I would pull the pan from the Mag and check, you might get lucky!
 

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Dan, i was going to say the same thing. I thought i read somewhere that the Magnum and K-series block were very similar. Richard, i would try to swap oil pans and if it does bolt up and seal, just grind the ears off of the block. Just a thought...

Quinten
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I tried matching up the oil pans several years ago and there was no way they would match without a lot of modification. I did find one guy who had done it but he had to make a plate to go between the block and the oil pan and I believe he had to tap new bolt holes, cut off part of the block and epoxy in where he cut off the ears. I don't remember now but there may have been a problem with the clearance of the rod.

Any way since it was a new engine I didn't want to do anything to destroy it.

Since this 140 I have was just a parts machine that would probably never be used I am really not out anything if I can get it to work and with a new engine it should last for years. My plans are to make it a dirt working machine with a tiller and front and mid blades along with the Gannon I have.
 
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