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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is the part number for the main belt that drives the mower deck?

also need the part number for the starter improvement relay. I heard there are two relays available to further prevent overcharging resulting in burned wires.

I used a ****ty crimp tool and it crushed the connectors. What is the best style crimper to use?
 

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There is no "grade 10" in the SAE bolt grade system. Some metric bolts are CLASS 10.9 per the folllowing specifications:
Class 10.9:​

  • Head Marking: 10.9
    • Material: Alloy steel, quenched and tempered
    • Size Range: 5-mm to 100-mm
Proof Load (MPa): 830​
Min. Yield Strength (MPa): 940​
Min. Tensile Strength (MPa): 1040​

Did you mean class 10.9??? The Deere part is a CH19101 BOLT which is an M8 x 45 metric bolt and most likely is a class 10.9... How were the bolt heads marked on the bolts you removed??

Note: a metric class 10.9 is roughly equivalent to the strength of a Class 8 SAE bolt...

Chuck
 

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332 belts.
PTO- m88112
50" mower deck - m41668
 
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The relays are regular 5 terminal type.
The 318 uses it for the starting circuit.
The 332 uses it for the overcharge condition.

Chuckv has a nice wire diagram to install it in a 332.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
There is no "grade 10" in the SAE bolt grade system. Some metric bolts are CLASS 10.9 per the folllowing specifications:
Class 10.9:​

  • Head Marking: 10.9
    • Material: Alloy steel, quenched and tempered
    • Size Range: 5-mm to 100-mm
Proof Load (MPa): 830​
Min. Yield Strength (MPa): 940​
Min. Tensile Strength (MPa): 1040​

Did you mean class 10.9??? The Deere part is a CH19101 BOLT which is an M8 x 45 metric bolt and most likely is a class 10.9... How were the bolt heads marked on the bolts you removed??

Note: a metric class 10.9 is roughly equivalent to the strength of a Class 8 SAE bolt...

Chuck
I’m not sure how the old bolts were marked I will look. I know for sure the new bolts are 10. Something but I can’t see the heads because everything is back together.
 

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The tool is very connector type specific -- and the purpose of the ratcheting tool is to compel you to have a complete stroke to make the recommended crimp - so not sure what you mean by not "going full throttle.". If your terminals are bare (without sleeves) then a different tool is required. Some tools have interchangeable dies so you can cover a wider range of connector pins/terminals with a single tool body.

The tool I showed above is suitable for these typical terminals with insulating sleeves:
Automotive lighting Liquid Cosmetics Fluid Lipstick


Note that the color of the sleeve indicates which die section is used for that particular crimp.

Chuck
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The tool is very connector type specific -- and the purpose of the ratcheting tool is to compel you to have a complete stroke to make the recommended crimp - so not sure what you mean by not "going full throttle.". If your terminals are bare (without sleeves) then a different tool is required. Some tools have interchangeable dies so you can cover a wider range of connector pins/terminals with a single tool body.

The tool I showed above is suitable for these typical terminals with insulating sleeves:
View attachment 286128

Note that the color of the sleeve indicates which die section is used for that particular crimp.

Chuck
I can’t back off when it clamps down. It forces me to go all the way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I can’t back off when it clamps down. It forces me to go all the way.
Is there two separate relays to buy or just the one I cobbled together? I’m going to get another one and do a good job this time. Would you recommend replacing both the battery and vr also? I know the battery is on its way out but the regulator is only about 4 years old. I can’t seem to understand a lot of the wiring stuff. But on the other hand I don’t do this kind of work day to day
 

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Your crimping tool is working just the way it is designed to do -- you have to complete a full crimping stroke with this type of ratcheting tool. If you don't get the crimp quality you believe you want/need then perhaps you don't have the correct tool for the terminal type you are using.

Here is an inexpensive imported set with interchangeable dies that covers quite a few styles of insulated and un-insulated terminals and even includes a wire stripper. I am unsure about the quality, but for the occasional hobby use it should suffice... link is here:
Product Guitar accessory Sleeve Gesture Font


Chuck
 
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