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Discussion Starter #1
Well, I finally picked up a transaxle for my 112. Mine grinds going into 2nd gear and I want to open it up, find the problem and rebuild it. But I also want to be able to run the tractor in the meantime, not that I really need it.

Found this one 5 miles from me, thanks to this site, and picked it up today. I plan on opening up this gearbox first and making sure it's OK to install in the tractor. Then I'll swap them out and open up the original one.

I'm going to document my work for myself and figured I'd also start a thread here. I've never opened up a gearbox before but there has to be a first time, I guess. Here's where we start



I think this one came out of an older tractor since the lever only has one bend in it and mine (1972) has 2 bends. All I got done today was stripping the external parts. Next I have to make my jig to hold the transaxle while I open it up.

If anyone has an input drive hub with 3 good holes please let me know. I hate drilling out broken bolts.


At this point my helpers were getting antsy. It's 37 degrees and raining. The garage is cold and dreary. The dogs are smart enough to stay in the house but I've got 2 of these guys (one male, one female) and they have to get involved in the action.

The fact that they hate each other doesn't make it any easier either. Between trying to stay clean enough to take pictures, doing the disassembly work, going to find flyaway birds and moving my arthritic bones I think I have to call it a day.
 

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Sounds like a grueling day at corporate!
If you could just get the birds to say
"you're not gonna do it that way, are you?"
every 5 minutes or so....
 

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Ed-
You are correct in that the rear end was from a round fender. The bracket attached to the shifter was the neutral switch. Do you have the manual for the pearless transaxle?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Jeremy,
I do have the Pearless manual which I've been pouring over the past few weeks. It all seems pretty straight forward, and as long as I take many pictures I think I'll be in good shape. I just hope that when I open up my original transmission I find something obvious that's broken, worn or just ground up. I don't know any history on the "new" transaxle that I'll be opening up first but I was told that it worked fine so hopefully all I'll need for the first one is springs, seals and gaskets. I know that I should replace the detent springs. Should I also replace the balls?
 

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New balls and springs come in the same package. If I were you, stand the trans up with the brake drum down so none of the spacers and parts fall out of place before you can take pictures.
 

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Ed,very timely new thread that I'll be watching closely. I've got my 214 Peerless with destroyed input shaft bearings ready to dive into, and a newly acquired 112 with sloppy gearshift lever all waiting till I return from AZ, NM, Mexico trip. Will be my first time into tranny repair as well.
 

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Hopefully you will not find a broken gear. 1st, 2nd and Reverse are all on the same gear and you really don't want to buy a new gear cluster. You maybe forced to take the gearcase apart that you just bought for parts. We had to replace a gear cluster in a '72 112 and it was going to be $350 for just the 1 cluster. We found a good used transaxle and parted it out. If you are grinding going into gear that means the input hasn't stopped spinning when you shift. If it grinds while in gear, it would be the detent balls and springs are shot and it is trying to jump gears on its own. Look for cracks in the teeth of the gears that will lead to a break in the future. It isn't uncommon for the sides of the teeth to be rounded where people have "ground" it into gear before.
 

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Ed, you may have read on here to leave the hub and wheel (opposite side of case bolt heads) on the transaxle to use as a work stand. That works very well if you only want to replace the balls, springs, gasket, and some gears. Or just take a look inside.
Since you don't know what you are getting into, and going to do two of them, the disassembly jig idea is the better choice. I made a paint table from a barbecue grill frame and wooden top so I could paint stuff and move the whole thing around while the paint is wet.
A couple trannys ago it got a 1 1/2" hole added in the top for the axle to slide thru. A couple pieces of wood slid under the case to keep it level and stable. Both axle extensions removed beforehand.
That allowed me to remove everything for cleaning and inspection. I prefer to replace the axle seals on both sides too, unless they are relatively new.
I got balls and springs under separate part numbers at JD recently. Sometimes you can see or feel slight defects in the surface of the ball. As inexpensive as they are, don't take a chance. If the old springs arn't broken, compare the to the new ones. You will probably find the old ones a tad shorter, meaning they are not up to snuff.
Got another tip about replacing the ball and spring, but will need to go take a picture to explain it better.

tommyhawk
 

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Here ya go. The piece at the top is .375 on the small end and .490 on the large end. The taper is about 20 degrees included. The angle is not critical, just shouldn't be too steep. Can be easily made on a lathe.
Something that works just as well and probably in your toolbox is a 1/4" x 1/4" drive socket. Don't use the extension shown in the photo. This one is in memory of a colorful member from Maine, who passed away a few years back. We got a bunch of good tips from him!
Put the shifter fork in a vise (lead or wood isolated please) so the hole is straight up.
Use a tooth pick or wire to guide the spring into the spring seat hole below. Put the small end of the socket or special tool in the rail bore close to but not covering the spring. Drop the ball in on top the spring. Push the socket past the ball, using the shifter rail (rod) until the small diameter captures the ball. Then push the socket or tool on thru until the ball locks in the shift rail groove.
If you are old and shaky like me, teach a youngster how to do this. Their keener eyesight is required to locate the ball that sometimes winds up on the floor, no matter what!



tommyhawk
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Well here's what we got done today,
The slow drain

Warmer temperature would have been appreciated. My wife hates the smell of gear lube.

Here's the patient by the way.

I'm using my table saw and workbench as my disassembly stand. Everything is pretty stable and it's in a corner of the garage which is necessary in order to get the wife's car in (very important). I had an awful time getting the axle housings off. The outboard bearings were extremely tight on the axles. I damaged the splines on one axle but the transmission came with an extra parts box and there's another axle assembly in there, so we're still good.

And finally the inspectors check everything out while we sample some of Carlo Rossi's finest. Have to let everything sit over the weekend while I go to work at Lowe's.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Couldn't let it sit today. Just had to split the cases and see what it looks like inside.
Here's what we found

Made sure it's in neutral


A bit of sludge, but I was surprised that the drain plug magnet was pretty clean.


Looks like the reverse idler gear has seen better days.
As I go through this I'll post pictures of the individual gears after cleaning and ask for input as to weather I should reinstall or replace them. Nothing looks broken, there is wear evident but I really don't have a good handle on how much wear is acceptable. And remember that I don't know any history on this gearbox.
 

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Inspectors are always good. Just don't teach them some new words. LOL

I rebuilt my first one when I was 14. I do know from experience that, in your first picture, the shifting forks on each side of the steel plate have a detent ball and spring inside them that keeps the shifting forks from sliding until a gear is selected. They sometimes get weak of fail and then the trans can go into two gears at once. Never good. Those get changed for sure.


Bevan
 

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The needle bearing by where the axle goes in the differential looks damaged.
The gear right under the reverse idler looks worn.
You might want to replace it if you can afford to.
The expensive one is the cluster gear, it has 3 gears all made together. Other than that, replace all seals, axle o-rings, the detent balls and springs, and the case gasket.
 

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Fascinating - never had one of those apart, seeing this makes me want to take one apart to see how it works. Goes on the bucket list. Thanks for posting.

Nice birds, what kind and do they bite?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Bevan - All springs & balls will get changed. Along with whatever else looks too worn to continue. And whatever the "inspectors" say, you can't understand them.

Joshua - You're right. I damaged the axle needle bearings when I disassembled everything. The outboard axle bearings were extremely tight on the axles and I had a lot of trouble removing the axle housings. Had to cut one bearing assembly with my Dremel in order to get it off. I'm pricing new brass drifts right now. Very expensive.

Anne - It really is neat to go through the transmission and see how it all works. The birds are not biters, but they take slowly to new people. We've had the female for 9 years (bought from a breeder) and since I'm semi-retired now and spend more time at home we got "Toby" a boyfriend. "Buddy" (bought as a used bird on line) is only 1-1/2 and has a boy's personality. All p*ss and vinegar. He's ready to take on the world. But as to be expected Toby hates Buddy with a passion not to be believed. And all I wanted was for some grandkids that I could sell.
 

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Ed,

I could never understand the Inspector I had in the shop either. It was a White cat that became a black cat after I changed oil in one tractor and set an open 5 gallon bucket of used oil down to wipe my hands. Cat saw it's reflection in the surface of the oil and had to inspect this new cat. Jumped right in and jumped right back out. Black cat made one heck of a mess running for a place to hide. Managed to grab the little critter and wipe him off before a good thorough washing for about an hour with dish soap. Cat survived but always kept it's comments to itself.
 

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Ed,

Thanks for posting the play-by-play. I have a '74 JD 110 and am just getting my sea legs around tractors. I will enjoy keeping track of your progress.

BTW, is that a chip in the casting (see pic below) or is that the way it's supposed to be?



Matthew
 

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Matt,

No that's not a chip. That's a shaft support boss and it was formed that way, apparently to clear one of the gears. The "cut side" has the same "as cast" finish of the rest of the inside of the case.

But your question brings up a good point. The limitations on this site to post pictures leaves a lot to be desired. No knocking of this site here at all, I understand the limitations of bandwidth, etc. But since there seems to be enough interest in following my rebuild I will be posting much higher resolution pictures on my Photobucket site. At some point I'll post the link to Photobucket, probably later this coming week when I actually remove the gear train and take some good meaningful pictures. Just keep in mind that I'm a novice at this transmission work and any time someone sees me going astray, please let me know.
 

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Great news for you. When I saw that I thought you might be in for a doozy. I'll be watching and learning right along with you. I'm a novice too. I think it's great that you are going full steam ahead and getting your hands dirty. I have a '74 JD 110. My latest project was to install a reverse light that's activated by a switch when I put her in reverse. It's a (bleep) trying to snow blow in that dark but now I have all the light I need.

BTW, I've also joined www.gardentractortalk.com and I'm enjoying the variety. I think you would like to site. I'm Moosetales over there; look me up if you're not already on that site too.

Matthew
 

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Guys, keep in mind going to sites like GT Talk and MTF is like going to your family doctor. If you want expert advice and help, you go to a specialist. WFM is your specialist. What I find ironic is that GT Talk and MTF does not like you linking to WFM, Red Square or other brand specific sites.

Also, the problem with outside hosting sites like photobucket is that the owner can and will delete his photos from time to time and if you linked to that photo on another site, then the photo is gone. So too is the valuable information and data that photo provides. Placing photos directly on a site like we do here keeps the photos on the site and it can't get deleted. A lot of owners of photobucket albums don't realized deleting their photo from photobucket breaks the link they had with other sites they had linked to.
 
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