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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 322 with standard 23x10.5-12 tires (12x8.5 rims). I am looking at buying 50 pound iron double notch rear wheel weights off a JD X585 that has 26x12-12 tires (12x9.5 rims). Will the weights fit my 322? The part numbers are different on the JDParts site but the weights look identical and of course the wheel diameter is 12 inches on both. I have to drive a good distance to look at the weights so it would be great to know they fit before I make the drive. Thanks for your help! Paul
 

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carriage bolts from homedepot worked fine for me

I bought the longest ones and cut them after mounting. I also used acorn nuts to hold them on so I never get cut from them
 
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Fleet farm can get 10 inch long ones. Fastenal can get even longer special order.
 

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I got stainless steel ones from menards, they are used on decks. 1/2" Diameter.
 

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You can also use threaded rod and then cut to length you need. I would recommend lock nuts on the inside of the wheel if using threaded rod to ensure the nut doesn't back off and the weight doesn't fall off. Another thin I do, if using full length threads is to put another nut on the outside of the rim securing the bolt/rod. It makes putting on weights a tad easier that way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Wheel Weight Installation

You can also use threaded rod and then cut to length you need. I would recommend lock nuts on the inside of the wheel if using threaded rod to ensure the nut doesn't back off and the weight doesn't fall off. Another thin I do, if using full length threads is to put another nut on the outside of the rim securing the bolt/rod. It makes putting on weights a tad easier that way.
Thanks, especially for the hint regarding an extra nut on the outside of the rim. From prior experience that will eliminate some acrobatic positions needed to hold the bolts in while putting weights on. I am picking up the 4 weights today. Paul
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I use a second nut on the inside with carriage bolts too. I just use a small section of 5/8" wash hose to make up the unthreaded part of the bolts.
I don't understand the purpose of the hose over the unthreaded portion of the carriage bolt. Also, when layering a second weight on top of the the weight on the rim, do you bolt them together before you bolt both to the rim?
Thanks! Paul
 

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the piece of hose fills the gap from the rims to the threaded portion of the bolt so the nut has something to tighten against.

1-push bolts through from the back of the rim
2- slide hoses over the threads and press the hoses against the rim
3- put a nut on, and tighten. your bolts are now held in place so you only need to handle the weights and nuts
4-put on wheel weight #1
5-add 2 nuts to tighten the first weight into place, make sure to tighten these nuts or you can get a lose out weight that cannot be tightened against the first
6- add the second weight
7-put on nuts to hold the second weight and tighten.....done
 

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A good metal spacer would be better as the hose will have too much flex to it when trying to line up the holes in the weights. I tried the hose and that's what I found.
 

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Terry,

I tried hard spacers, but they made the bolts bolt angle towards the center of the wheel, making it impossible to get a weight on. I had lots of black pipe laying around and though it was a good idea too.

KB
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks, I finally see the purpose when using a carriage bolt vs threaded rod. It will be tempting though to try metal spacers as debated below. I would think if the spacers had perfectly flat ends and the rim was flat that it would work out (but theory and practical results often differ). Paul
 

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Terry,

I tried hard spacers, but they made the bolts bolt angle towards the center of the wheel, making it impossible to get a weight on. I had lots of black pipe laying around and though it was a good idea too.

KB
That's why a threaded rod is better, as they have full length threads, and you can cut them to length. Not to mention you can get 2 or 3 foot ones and cut them to length and still have enough to make more rods. Just be sure you use self locking nuts on the inside of the rim to keep them from backing off and coming off.
 

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That's why a threaded rod is better, as they have full length threads, and you can cut them to length. Not to mention you can get 2 or 3 foot ones and cut them to length and still have enough to make more rods. Just be sure you use self locking nuts on the inside of the rim to keep them from backing off and coming off.
.

What ever work for you is great. just sharing my experience and preference.
 

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To each his own. I think all of us would rather have a bolt, but finding one full threaded for a reasonable price is harder, plus getting the length we want a bit harder still. McMaster Carr has all kinds of bolts, and if you can find a grade 8, that's even better. I do admit cutting threaded rod isn't for everyone if you don't have the right kind of tools to do so.
 

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To each his own. I think all of us would rather have a bolt, but finding one full threaded for a reasonable price is harder, plus getting the length we want a bit harder still. McMaster Carr has all kinds of bolts, and if you can find a grade 8, that's even better. I do admit cutting threaded rod isn't for everyone if you don't have the right kind of tools to do so.

Full thread is actually is no better then a 2" unthreaded portion. the reason is the length of the square part of the carriage bolt still doesn't allow you to tighten them in place without some sort of spacer.

I can find up to 12" carriage bolts at either of my local hardware stores, lowes and home depot, those have been long enough to put a double stack on any of my tractors. Walmart and TSC did have limited lengths available less then 8" or 10".

the one thing I cannot find in my area is threaded rod that doesn't have the threads all banged up. I have used some for other projects, and I always have to cull the ends and still re-thread parts of the rod to get nuts on. I've tried all of the suppliers listed above, and napa with the same results, and at this point hate working with it.

With flipping tractors to fund my herd, I have done more sets in the last few years then I want to add up, that I really want to think about, but this method has worked well, and quickly every time I use it, even doing everything with one hand. when I get a new tractor, I have to ask a neighbor to help just to remove weights mounted with threaded rod or regular bolts, or it will take me longer to get them off a tractor then it does for me to mount them in the manor I described, just because it is completely impossible for me to hold a wrench on both sides of a rim. with or without a weight involved

I don't mean to knock anyone else's method if it works for them, but since this really is the only method that works well for me, it should work for anyone.
 

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Here is what I did for mounting the wheel weights -- these are starter weights and are heavy enough to make you sensitive to those bolts moving out of reach when you are lifting those monsters...

I used short sections of rubber hose around the bolts between the washers against the wheel dish and the washers/nuts you see that hold the bolts in approximate position. This lets the bolts flex 'a little' so everything lines up when you present the weight to the wheel to mount it. These are of course carriage bolts...



Chuck
 

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