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What an awesome project! I mean, who builds their own muffler? I can't wait to hear the audio of the final result!
There we go again, putting all this pressure on this poor guy. But I'm anxiously waiting also.
 
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The engine swap is coming along pretty good. I can’t help but wonder if the ss screens in the muffler chambers will vibrate and rattle. Did you weld the screens inside each chamber to prevent rattling and vibration noises? Also wondering if they are loosely in place will the vibrations cause excessive wear and premature exhaust failure. I’ve never fabricated an exhaust so I’m asking for educational purposes :)

Finished up the other end section:
View attachment 268707
Then added the next section of tube:
View attachment 268708
And some more mineral wool:
View attachment 268709
Stainless perf added and the center section done as well:
View attachment 268710
Disks welded in place:
View attachment 268711
And finally, the complete muffler canister:
View attachment 268712

View attachment 268713

I put some effort into holding it in place to start fabricating the head pipes, but just didn’t have enough hands and eyes. I was planning on a support bracket anyway, so it looks like that has been moved up the priority list. Hope to get this supported in the correct location tonight so that I can finish up the pipes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #143 ·
The engine swap is coming along pretty good. I can’t help but wonder if the ss screens in the muffler chambers will vibrate and rattle. Did you weld the screens inside each chamber to prevent rattling and vibration noises? Also wondering if they are loosely in place will the vibrations cause excessive wear and premature exhaust failure. I’ve never fabricated an exhaust so I’m asking for educational purposes :)
The inlet sections and the outlet section are tacked. The smaller sections are not.
No idea if it will rattle or otherwise cause problems. We’ll all find out together, I guess.
I’ve never built a muffler before. No experience to draw from.
 

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Well it looks like you are doing a decent job either way. :)
 
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Discussion Starter · #145 ·
Built a bracket to help support the muffler:
268746

It attaches to the engine mount I made:
268747

Luckily I decided to test fit the assembly after tacking the bracket to the muffler. The PTO cable interfered with the first position.
268748

So I cut the bracket back off and tried again. The second time it cleared, but was still very close.
268749

So I tried one more time and am happy with this clearance. Sorry for the poor photo.
268750

And a few photos with the muffler in place:
268751


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268754

I started making the head pipes to fit. The left side is just a straight shot. I have it cut, but the muffler needs to come back off to fit it. No pics. The right side requires a tight little S curve. I got started on it but have some careful fitting to do.
268755
 

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You would make your own <fill in the blank> wouldn't you.(y)
 

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When I modified the existing 317 muffler to match the Kohler Command I installed I used the same procedure. As yours, the right side lined up directly but the left (sitting on the machine) required a couple of 45's and a short extension. I purchased the engine flanges from Kohler. The most important thing to me was hitting the hole in the side cover. It did but was a little short and I had to add an extension to the tail pipe.

It worked out fine. The welds on the thin muffler metal was the challenge. In the end it sounded just like the KT17 that the muffler came from. And that was all I expected. I thought about packing it but decided against it. For no particular reason other than the mystery of it.

I'm wondering how heavy your assembly is and if you think it will be an issue with vibration cracking things?

Your certainly proving an expensive kit isn't required. Not that your labor hasn't any value but for those of us that like to DIY your showing what's possible.
 
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Discussion Starter · #149 ·
The most important thing to me was hitting the hole in the side cover. It did but was a little short and I had to add an extension to the tail pipe.
Yes, getting the pipe to line up with the side panel is a requirement for me. Of course I’ll be building the entire pipe.

I'm wondering how heavy your assembly is and if you think it will be an issue with vibration cracking things?
The muffler isn’t too heavy. I’d guess 7lbs maybe. If course that will grow as I add the pipes.
I was more worried about the loads that would be put on the exhaust studs at the heads than I was about cracking anything on the muffler. That is what drove me to add the bracket down to the engine mount.
I do not expect to have any problems with the bracket in place.
 

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For final weld up, if the exhaust ports are in the same plane, consider making a substantial template plate to minimize movement from the heat shrinkage. Maybe bolt the flanges to your welding bench. Anything to keep the flanges as lined up as possible. You'll still need to tweak them to fit the engine but a plate will ease the process. The bolt up needs to be nice and square and flat to not introduce stress on the engine.
 

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Or, just to make the exhaust more complicated, skip trying to hit the side cover hole altogether. Keep up the good work!

View attachment 268767

View attachment 268768
Commonly referred to a a "weedburner" exhaust. Likely from their propensity of starting grass fires. My vote goes for the original look. And puts that hole in the side cover to good use. Or, saves the time and money of finding and buying a cover without that gapping hole. Yours is nice work but not what I would do. But as they say? JMHO
 

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Discussion Starter · #153 ·
Or, just to make the exhaust more complicated, skip trying to hit the side cover hole altogether. Keep up the good work!

View attachment 268767

View attachment 268768
I had considered routing the pipe to the ground once upon a time, but forgot all about it. Not too late to change my mind I guess.
I think I might have a spare side shield from an early serial number without the hole. Hmm…
 

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Discussion Starter · #154 ·
For final weld up, if the exhaust ports are in the same plane, consider making a substantial template plate to minimize movement from the heat shrinkage. Maybe bolt the flanges to your welding bench. Anything to keep the flanges as lined up as possible. You'll still need to tweak them to fit the engine but a plate will ease the process. The bolt up needs to be nice and square and flat to not introduce stress on the engine.
Yes, stainless has WAY LOTS more expansion and contraction than mild steel. It moves all over the darn place as the welds cool. Keeping the flanges in place will not be trivial.
 

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Maybe bolt the flanges to your welding bench. Anything to keep the flanges as lined up as possible. You'll still need to tweak them to fit the engine but a plate will ease the process. The bolt up needs to be nice and square and flat to not introduce stress on the engine.
My muffler is not Stainless, so maybe this wouldn't work, but for mine, we bolted the flanges with extension pipes to the engine, then I held the muffler in place while the fabricator welded it to the extension pipes. This insured the final positioning included flanges that were flush w/ the exhaust ports, and eliminated my backfiring issue. Once muffler - extension pipes are welded, you could then slide the support bracket in place and attach.
 

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I was thinking if I was to try building a muffler like this I would weld the pipes in place bolted on the motor and the muffler welded and bolted to the mounting plate before welding the pipes to the muffler. Naturally it might be too tight of a fit to do this. Have you considered doing a 2 or 3 piece exhaust with clamps and pipes that slip fit into one another like on some motorcycles?
 

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My wife calls my JD pic collection 'tractor porn' and says she's gonna expose me if I don't do what she says. The pics in this thread don't help. In fact they're making things worse. :D
 

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Having done this sort of thing very often, (which is why I'm so interested in the part of the install) I've never done it the same way twice. Way back in the day (here we go again) when racing was in my blood we fabricated headers for everything from late models to sprint cars. It was about the time when Headman and Culbert were just starting in the business of racing parts. Getting one end of a steel pipe where you want it is hard to do. We did have the benefit of an exhaust shop with the mandrels to bend rather than weld fittings. And we still ended up with a lot of scrap pipe.

My point is, there are as many ways to do this as there are folks doing it. I've thought about chiming in with suggestions but looking back at what he's accomplished so far I'll set back and maybe learn from him. I would once again warn him about piping the exhaust under the tractor mainly because the 420 presently getting torn down in my shop met its demise from a grass fire. (of unknown origin) And that's the main reason you never see farm equipment with bottom exhaust.

I would be interested in learning a bit more about his welding techniques and what equipment he's using. Stainless is the modern choice for exhaust systems and it's relatively easy to weld with the right equipment. None of which I have access to any longer. When I had it, it was expensive. But who knows what Harbor Freight has come up with these days.
 

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My point is, there are as many ways to do this as there are folks doing it. I've thought about chiming in with suggestions but looking back at what he's accomplished so far I'll set back and maybe learn from him. I would once again warn him about piping the exhaust under the tractor mainly because the 420 presently getting torn down in my shop met its demise from a grass fire. (of unknown origin) And that's the main reason you never see farm equipment with bottom exhaust.
This is a technique known as "Pause and Learn". But I and many others like myself want to jump in and suggest, suggest, suggest. Having modified a muffler on a 111H, I am more content to watch and learn.
 

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When I routed the exhaust out the bottom (slightly aimed forward), I hadn't considered burning the county down. But I suppose it's possible. In my defense, every John Deere One Series has the same approximate exhaust location. Probably more Deeres have a "down and away" location, too. One advantage is that the exhaust note is quieter (plus no soot on the loader arms) and probably more like the early 400's with a front exhaust.

I don't have a ton of experience welding exhaust systems, but I was a pretty popular guy in high school because I could weld bongs that didn't leak. Oxy-acetylene back then but what I would have given to have TIG.

Back to the interesting and fun muffler building spectating from my armchair quarterbacking chair...
 
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