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Nice restoration project! The other comments are useful as well.
I will comment that I have done several restorations over the years in varying degrees. I have learned to use the following process:
1. I am fairly picky about the tractors I purchase for projects. I want the machine to be technically "all there" first. That includes: a.) all/most of the sheet metal is there and straight. b.) the tractor is capable of functioning as originally built (which includes the engine, electrical/hydraulic system, mower deck, lack of "add on" customized parts.) c). safety systems are present/can be made functional.
2. Since I am a "maintenance nut", I usually determine the actual condition of the tractor next by doing a full engine tune-up, fluid and filter changes, check the mower deck bearings, etc. I also validate the safety system circuits (neutral start circuits, PTO interlocks) are fully functional. Some may say that isn't necessary, and will be the first thing that is disconnected by the next owner, but I have been in a Product Support role long enough to know that I can say: "It worked when I had it!" might just save me from becoming part of a lawsuit. I personally knew a company representative that was in a lawsuit where a Dad backed over his own kid's legs with a garden tractor while mowing his yard. The sight of that kid sitting in the court room in a wheel chair with no legs haunted that guy the rest of his life.
3. Once I get all of that done, I clean up the tractor. I am always amazed what a good bath and some polishing compound will do.
4. Then I usually mow with the tractor several times to make sure the machine/engine performs the way it should.
5. At that point, I determine if I want to sell or keep the tractor, which includes totaling all the costs up to this point. I have done enough of these to know this is the day of reckoning. Can I sell it as a fully functional machine for what I have in it (and some labor recovery), or do I want to keep it and take it further? This is where it goes from keeping an ol' retired guy busy, to a hobby. In my experience, if it gets to the hobby stage it is better for me not to know what I have spent. Just call it "justifiable deniability" if/when my wife asks me: "How much do you have in that thing?" That's not to say my wife gives me much heat for my hobby, but after 42 years of marriage, terrorists don't bother me anymore either........
 

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Discussion Starter #23
I sand blasted and primed and painted two part urathane labels and paint like 350
You did a great job Roger. I have a question and by no means want to criticize it. But the fender pan seems to have a rough texture or orange peal look. Was this due to the sand blasting? I've been using a lot of water jet blasting lately with an attachment you install on your pressure washer. I've also had it done in a local shop on a few occasions. But the finish after blasting in this manner is so rough its hard to get a smooth paint finish. I think in the future I will likely limit the blasting to the underside of the parts and go back to chemicals for the area's that show. Just wondering if you did the same?
 

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I've been using a lot of water jet blasting lately with an attachment you install on your pressure washer. I've also had it done in a local shop on a few occasions. But the finish after blasting in this manner is so rough its hard to get a smooth paint finish.
Your water jet blasting cuts the metal and leaves an eroded surface? Three or 4000 psi does this?
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Your water jet blasting cuts the metal and leaves an eroded surface? Three or 4000 psi does this?
This I now know. But I did get a decent finish using quite a bit of high build and a lot of sanding and buffing. I was curious if Roger did the same. Water blasting does cut through heavy rust quite well. On my last 80 cart it was about all I could do to clean it up. It's and everyday work cart. Wouldn't take it to the fair.
 

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You did a great job Roger. I have a question and by no means want to criticize it. But the fender pan seems to have a rough texture or orange peal look. Was this due to the sand blasting? I've been using a lot of water jet blasting lately with an attachment you install on your pressure washer. I've also had it done in a local shop on a few occasions. But the finish after blasting in this manner is so rough its hard to get a smooth paint finish. I think in the future I will likely limit the blasting to the underside of the parts and go back to chemicals for the area's that show. Just wondering if you did the same?
I did sand blast on both surfaces i am sure it’s a combination of things and I really don’t care about a orange peel look just want it to be rust free was two part urathane and no oil water separating on my compressor
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Thanks for that info. As so many of these old tractors have major surface rust its always good to know how others deal with it. Without breaking the bank. I would guess one could easily run up four or five hundred dollars trying to achieve that perfect showroom shine.
 

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i reworked a 317 a couple of years ago, i think it came up to around 500.
tractor with blown series 1 $200
briggs opposed twin 18 $100
1" flywheel shaft adapt $65
crank seal $15
regulator/rect $15
ignition sw $20
replace hydraulic line $10
hydro oil / filter $20
some other misc hardware and i've been mowing 2 summers so far so good.
 

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Nice write up...thanks. 317s are excellent machines...definitely the underdog of the JD line due to fears about oil pressure in the Series 1 Kohler twins. I really enjoyed the one I snagged awhile back and put back right...no list of cost though. Let it go to a CL buyer who showed up to buy my re-preserved 316...liked em both and paid a fair price I thought. Was interesting watching him make a load in his already loaded truck/trailer.
 

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I bought my 317 in 2008 with what the PO thought was a "blown" engine for $200 or $250 as I recall -- it was in the middle of an un-mowed field with grass growing as high as the wheels. It was also covered in pavement sealer as it was used to reseal parking lots when it was running. It came with a very nice tiller and a small model 41 deck. It had a dealer installed Onan P218 engine. Here are some before pictures:
317 -- tarred but not feathered.jpg


317 with seal coat slop.jpg


The engine issue was actually a cracked flywheel and out of time electronic ignition, so a used flywheel for $100 and a few new parts from Onan/Cummins for under $50 put all that straight. Also bought a new seat for $59. Here is a picture of the cracked flywheel key way. The engine itself was very clean and was low hours for sure.
crack in flywheel at keyway.jpg


engine as found - almost clean.jpg


So I had well under $500 into this 317 when it was running right, but DON'T count the labor getting all that pavement sealer off!!! Lots of nasty solvents were involved and plenty of elbow grease...

317 fender pan cleaned of pavement sealer.jpg


I sold this tractor for about $1100 back in 2010 (but with stock wheels/tires -- not with those pictured here.)
5XX - 7XX wheels on 317.jpg



Chuck
 

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So what worked best in the way of solvents/technique, if you care to revisit that chore...understand if you don't. When I was doing antique outboard motors, I found old-fashioned oven cleaner to be a good choice as long as I was good with refinishing whatever surface it went on...gloves, respirator, ventilation very necessary.
 

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I don't recall the product name but I got it from the guy that sold me the tractor -- I was dubious since it was very apparent he never used it himself. :mad:

It was water clean-up and may be similar to this:
Solvall Tar Remover

I was trying to save as much of the original paint as possible, and think this was a reasonable tradeoff considering the state in which i found the sealer contamination. I even saved much of the decal..., but you can see why I replaced the tires. I did get the wheels 'fairly clean" with a pressure washer and this solvent.
up to the axle in pavement sealer.jpg


front wheel cleaned.jpg


Chuck
 

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Discussion Starter #34
I don't recall the product name but I got it from the guy that sold me the tractor -- I was ddubious since it was very apparent he never used it himself. :mad:

It was water clean-up and may be similar to this:
Solvall Tar Remover

I was trying to save as much of the original paint as possible, and think this was a reasonable tradeoff considering the state in which i found the sealer contamination. I even saved much of the decal..., but you can see why I replaced the tires. I did get the wheels 'fairly clean" with a pressure washer and this solvent.
View attachment 265013

View attachment 265015

Chuck
You have a lot more ambition than I would ever have!
 

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I vaguely remember using an air scaler on this project -- but not on any of the painted parts...just the hitch adapter that he used to tow the sealant squeegee behind the tractor.

rear squeegee bracket before.jpg


rear bracket after needle scaler light pass.jpg


Chuck
 

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That kind of bravery got me in more than one jam over the years and I have the scars to prove it. :p

That kind of "bravery" comes from faith in yourself (no matter how unfounded or foolish it is...) :)
Chuck
 
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Now I’m reconsidering going fully through the 317...
My wallet just called the courts for a restraining order, great...
 
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