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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

Well I decided to try to turn my parts tractor I bought at an auction into a project for restoration. I have a couple of other round fenders in the pipeline (working with an outstanding member on this site to buy another one so I can find how the parts are supposed to go back on!) so in the meantime thought I'd start tearing apart the 1966H and see how far I can get. I have an engine in the works for it. Missing a few other pieces but it's mostly there. I have no idea if the transaxle works well, if the hydraulics work, etc. Time will tell I guess.

Thought I'd share/ask a few things:

- While waiting I decided to build a workbench that I can use for pounding on parts when needed. Ended up getting a bit carried away with the oak top and JD paint!

- If any of you have any advice to a newbie in his first rebuild (I want a high quality end product) please chime in. Sentences like "If I had to do my first rebuild again I'd certainly do......xxxxxxx!" or "I learned it's really important to do .....xxxxxx" Any answers that fills in the sentence is most welcome!!

Please wish me luck and I hope you don't mind the forthcoming stupid questions over the months to come!!! :lol:

Thought I'd attach a few photos to illustrate what a mess my tractor is and how clean my workbench is. Over time I hope those will reverse!!
 

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I think you need some outlets near that bench
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Can't see them due to that railing, but there are some power bars lurking out of sight and can be moved to the sides. Lots of power outlets.
 

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Me,if I were to start on one again(which I have),don't use rattle can paint. It chips easy,as it doesn't really have any hardener in it.

The bench looks great,but as Knotty says,it needs some outlets. Sand blast everything,or what ever media you have.A sand blast cabinet is an asset as is a parts washer,bigger parts find a place for them to be done.And always take your wallet with you,it is an expensive endeavour

Good luck,and keep the pics coming

Grant
 
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Also a high capacity compressor,for painting and tools,run 3/8's couplers,not 1/4" .For painting,you need the volume of air to paint correctly,and to run the sand blaster
 
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Don't forget a big compressor for blasting and painting. I have about 3k into garage upgrades and equipment. I'm hoping to get back to work on it either next month, or spring time. My garage heat is limited still, so no painting if I can't keep it above freezing for 24 hours.
 

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Some things that might help. Pictures, lots of them, close ups when possible, and take them before removing parts. You might be surprised how easy it is to put stuff back wrong. Of course there may be some things already changed from the original way it came from the factory.

Get a box of zip lock bags and a black marker. Put each small part in a bag with its hardware. Clean things one bag at a time so things don't get mixed.

On one of mine I kept a log of the parts as they were removed so they could be put back in reverse order. This is harder than you might think. Easy to forget to write something down, then find you have to remove a freshly painted part that makes it difficult or impossible to install the next part you pick up! BTDT

Label every wiring connection with masking tape, write anything important on the tape.

We'll think of some more things, but the main thing is to not make a JOB out of it. Take your time and enjoy the process. When you run into a frustration, step back, clean some more parts, think it through, and things will work out.

Best to have a service manual and a parts book close at hand, too.

tommyhawk
 

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Buy a new wiring harness, label bags with bolts, if your going to do it don't go half way do it all engine rebuild trans rebuild the whole dang thing. Print off a copy of the service manual to keep on the bench at all times.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks to everyone for the advice.

I have a list of shop tools to buy. Just need to space it out a bit. Compressor is the first large purchase and I'll get a pretty good one. In our city I found a "do it yourself" sand blasting place. They provide an industrial quality setup and charge by the hour pro-rated. I'll take all the big stuff there and figure I can get it all done in an hour. They come home and prime everything (weather dependent). If the winter falls before I get this much done then maybe I'll take some of the winter and open up all the mechanicals.

I'm a bit reluctant to open up the transmission. That seems like quite a daunting step. Anyone comment on doing that their first time?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
What fantastic advice. I tend to get too focused and burn out on things so I'll heed your words!


Some things that might help. Pictures, lots of them, close ups when possible, and take them before removing parts. You might be surprised how easy it is to put stuff back wrong. Of course there m

We'll think of some more things, but the main thing is to not make a JOB out of it. Take your time and enjoy the process. When you run into a frustration, step back, clean some more parts, think it through, and things will work out.


tommyhawk
 

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Thanks to everyone for the advice.
I'm a bit reluctant to open up the transmission. That seems like quite a daunting step. Anyone comment on doing that their first time?
I think Bill Fleish documented it when he did his 63 110 recently. Do a search and I'm sure it will pop up. There has been discussion on other years too, but can't remember who or when
 

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TSC is where I got my compressor,sand blast cabinet and parts washer...The transaxle is unbelieveably simple once you've done it,but really take your time with it as it can be confusing
blast (360 x 480).jpg
Georgina-20140308-00055.jpg compressor in back ground
 
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Don't sweat the trans-axle.... I just finished mine as a first time'r and it wasn't near as complex as I thought. I agree with everyone who said service manual and parts manual, both, are a must. Take your time in dis-assembly and keep stuff in order. Just think about putting months into restore only to find out you have problem here. Get into it and inspect the gears.

Chances are they will all be fine but you will have a chance to change the oil seals, axle bearings, and detent springs/balls... none of which cost much.

I know when I got mine back together it was cool to have an understanding of how the thing operated..... nice piece of equipment.
 

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Okay... think you've convinced me. Nicer to do mechanical work inside than painting (like better ventilation that is easier to do in the warmer months up here!).

Are the bearings and seals still available? I'll do a search later but thought I'd ask if you have any handy info....





Don't sweat the trans-axle.... I just finished mine as a first time'r and it wasn't near as complex as I thought. I agree with everyone who said service manual and parts manual, both, are a must. Take your time in dis-assembly and keep stuff in order. Just think about putting months into restore only to find out you have problem here. Get into it and inspect the gears.

Chances are they will all be fine but you will have a chance to change the oil seals, axle bearings, and detent springs/balls... none of which cost much.

I know when I got mine back together it was cool to have an understanding of how the thing operated..... nice piece of equipment.
 

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Yup,and so are any gears you need from JD,seals and bearings from mother deere or Canada bearing
 
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Hello,
I am starting the same thing as you, my first restoration on a 66 Round fender. It is a huge project, and have taken things to get sand and/or media blasted. I am almost done taking things apart, and I agree its as good idea to bag and label parts. My toughest part was getting the steering wheel off, loosening a few bolts (used lots of WD-40!) and a couple of stubborn cotter pins. My tranny is OK but need to get both the carb and engine rebuilt. I also try to look at it as fun and have a working '65 to go by in case I get in trouble putting things back together. Everyone on this forum has been helpful to me and its a great resource! Enjoy!
 

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I do have a copy of the service manual (but it is a copy and not sure it will be legible enough). I do not have a separate engine one however. Where are those available?

I am also printing off ALL the diagrams off of JDParts.com for the tractor. Despite the resource I KNOW I will have a lot of questions! Can't get over how helpful people on this site are! I hope to gain a lot of knowledge then in turn help others too!





Do you have a service manuals for tractor & motor? If not members will happily help solve the inevitable dilemmas.
View attachment 16865
 

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Enjoy your project too! Due to my other obligations and job not sure how many hours per week I'll get to work on it and I want to make sure it stays a hobby not turn into an obsession. But I'm sure going to enjoy it!!!!
 
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