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I like that Onan ad, does that say 1989 as the print date?
 

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I guess this will be my last post but I did find a clearer figure to post in case someone searches years from now. The very low rpm torque will be superior in a diesel which is important in applications like moving a freight truck off stop without a lot of slipping the clutch. In garden tractor applications, I don't care much about low rpm torque since I have a variable displacement hydro motor powering the rear wheels and I can use any rpm I desire. As for PTO loads, I really care about response to load when running at operating speed. If I am mowing grass or blowing snow and encounter load that requires additional torque, how does my engine respond. As you can see in the attached pic, the Onan responds quite well.

Also, back in post 24 it was shown that the diesel Yanmar gained about 10% torque when encountering a load that pulled the engine rpm down from 3000 rpm to 2000 rpm.

All these engines are great !!

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Just need to find the curves for the 322! I converted the photo to a straight plot below.

I think all these engines are neat, and just plain good. Each has its strengths and weaknesses. You want something that is dead simple, reliable, and fits in a really small package? The Onan cannot be beat. You want something a little quieter, a little smoother? Go for the Yanmar gas. You want significantly better fuel consumption, or don't have gas on hand because you're on a farm where everything runs on diesel? Go for the 332. To each their own. All are extremely capable engines for their vintage.

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I had an Onan powered stationary generator at the off-grid home I built in the late 70's. It ran at 1800 RPM because it was meant to run 24/7 in many applications. Notice that it would only produce a bit more than 10 HP at that speed per the charts above -- which seems about right for its rated 4KW ac output, considering how "overbuilt" the Onan genset was and that it was fueled by propane...and that the continuous load curve shows about 8 HP. Seems logical, since for a 3600 gas engine you would normally need 7 to 8 HP for a generator of this rating.

Just another real-world operating point from direct personal experience...

Chuck
 

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I can tell by you're handle where your heart lies. But that's OK. To be honest, I never really knew why we stayed away from Cummins back in the day. Likely price. Dad had one in his Emeryville. But you shouldn't put the Dodge name in front of the Cummins as if they had anything to do with it other than signing a contract that kept Cummins in business. And Dodge to boot as they were pretty much in the tank before they went out of house to find something to sell. My only question is? Did they ever make a quiet Dodge? Nothing converts good fuel into noise better than a Dodge. And you should have more respect for those Furds. Over 40 years being the best seller. Maybe you're missing something.

Are we trashing talking here? :)
Well I will tell you my neighbor and his son are both firefighters for our local FD. They both have the 6.0 diesels and you want to talk about noise and no go, ha ha. It sounds like they are going 70mph but they are going 25mph to get to the station when she blows the sirens. ;)
I'll give you that the 7.3 is a good engine but then again it was made by International. Since Furd has been making their own engines well......... lets just say my diesel mechanic always has 8-10 of them waiting for service, Same with the duramax trucks. I have driven my ex-FIL's 6.0 after I welded up the after market Aluminum bed for him and it couldn't get out of it's own way flat to the floor warmed up and was louder than my CTD.
But I don't call my 93 "rattler" for nothing. She's noisy until you get to 1500 rpms. ;)

I could argue the fact that Furd sells so many trucks because they end up in the scrap yard sooner than the Dodges. :ROFLMAO: My adopted family was/are Furd guys and have been since I became part of the family in 1971. I was the one that got to work on them all so that turned my head away from Furd. All my friends had Chebbies, and my grandfather ran Chrysler. So I went Mopar in 84 when I bought my third car and never looked back. I have personally only owned 3 vehicles that were not Mopar since 84. A 78 2wd Datsun truck (bought in 87 and traded it for a 77 Trailduster after I did bodywork and paint on it), and an 83 and an 85 Mercedes 300D diesel wagons. I still have the 85 wagon but it is on it's way to a friends house soon.

I had a Chevy truck that had the 350 Buick engine converted to diesel. It was replaced with a Oldsmobile 403 small block. That was fun at a auto parts store to explain what I had.
LOL....... I remember working on the Chebby trucks, Buick and Olds wagons that had those engines in them. Yep even NAPA had a hard time getting parts. Most times we had to wait for factory parts for them from the dealer I worked at. The parts guys hated those engines.
 

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OK, Onan's may have more torque in certain use applications at certain RPM's, but just try to get a 332 (with an un-molested 332 fuel pump/governor/fuel screw) to use the same amount of fuel as an Onan. And if you are using that much fuel continuously with a 332, it will overheat any where north of 90 degrees....guaranteed!

In my experience, I know exactly when I am getting everything the ol 332 has in her (usually when snow throwing) as the exhaust has a tint of black smoke show up just before the RPM's start to drop. When I see that, I know my toes are over the available HP cliff.
 

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OK, Onan's may have more torque in certain use applications at certain RPM's, but just try to get a 332 (with an un-molested 332 fuel pump/governor/fuel screw) to use the same amount of fuel as an Onan. And if you are using that much fuel continuously with a 332, it will overheat any where north of 90 degrees....guaranteed!

In my experience, I know exactly when I am getting everything the ol 332 has in her (usually when snow throwing) as the exhaust has a tint of black smoke show up just before the RPM's start to drop. When I see that, I know my toes are over the available HP cliff.
All of this :ROFLMAO:

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Tundras Rock!
Yep! My son has one and I can't say anything bad about it. Could use a little more class but it is a truck no doubt. I think a new model is due out soon. I'm sure they will jazz it up a bit. Hopefully, keep the price down.
 

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Ye gads guys! I think you're losing your grip here. It's just a toy garden tractor. A forty-year-old one at that. Do you really think those charts taken from a likely blueprinted engine in perfect conditions with who knows what fuel has anything to do with what you now have all these years later?
 

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Well I will tell you my neighbor and his son are both firefighters for our local FD. They both have the 6.0 diesels and you want to talk about noise and no go, ha ha. It sounds like they are going 70mph but they are going 25mph to get to the station when she blows the sirens. ;)
I'll give you that the 7.3 is a good engine but then again it was made by International. Since Furd has been making their own engines well......... lets just say my diesel mechanic always has 8-10 of them waiting for service, Same with the duramax trucks. I have driven my ex-FIL's 6.0 after I welded up the after market Aluminum bed for him and it couldn't get out of it's own way flat to the floor warmed up and was louder than my CTD.
But I don't call my 93 "rattler" for nothing. She's noisy until you get to 1500 rpms. ;)

I could argue the fact that Furd sells so many trucks because they end up in the scrap yard sooner than the Dodges. :ROFLMAO: My adopted family was/are Furd guys and have been since I became part of the family in 1971. I was the one that got to work on them all so that turned my head away from Furd. All my friends had Chebbies, and my grandfather ran Chrysler. So I went Mopar in 84 when I bought my third car and never looked back. I have personally only owned 3 vehicles that were not Mopar since 84. A 78 2wd Datsun truck (bought in 87 and traded it for a 77 Trailduster after I did bodywork and paint on it), and an 83 and an 85 Mercedes 300D diesel wagons. I still have the 85 wagon but it is on it's way to a friends house soon.



LOL....... I remember working on the Chebby trucks, Buick and Olds wagons that had those engines in them. Yep even NAPA had a hard time getting parts. Most times we had to wait for factory parts for them from the dealer I worked at. The parts guys hated those engines.
Definanatly time to unfollow this post.
 

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OK, Onan's may have more torque in certain use applications at certain RPM's, but just try to get a 332 (with an un-molested 332 fuel pump/governor/fuel screw) to use the same amount of fuel as an Onan. And if you are using that much fuel continuously with a 332, it will overheat any where north of 90 degrees....guaranteed!

In my experience, I know exactly when I am getting everything the ol 332 has in her (usually when snow throwing) as the exhaust has a tint of black smoke show up just before the RPM's start to drop. When I see that, I know my toes are over the available HP cliff.
Wow and I thought I loved my 332! :ROFLMAO: I agree, I have not had a gas engine perform or "GRUNT" the way the 332 does. Then I can mow the yard 2.5 times (one tank of fuel) with the Onan. I can mow the yard 4 times with the 332 with the same deck as the 318.
oh I'll take the fuel sipping of the diesel for sure.
 

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I asked what I thought was a simple question regarding torque and have created a monster. Looks like to many people have way to much time on their hands.
HAPPY THANKSGIVING
I think everyone is passionate about their tractors. I know I am, and I'm a data nerd. I hope to have one of each of the 3 one day lol

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I asked what I thought was a simple question regarding torque and have created a monster. Looks like to many people have way to much time on their hands.
HAPPY THANKSGIVING 🐔
Now we are getting to the heart of the matter. May we all love and appreciate the tractors we have,
 

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I asked what I thought was a simple question regarding torque and have created a monster. Looks like to many people have way to much time on their hands.
HAPPY THANKSGIVING 🐔
I’m with knockknock, this is very important to me! I’ve been debating in my head for about 5 months which tractor I’m going to put the berco snowblower on. It’s big, requires a lot to power it and snow can be heavy. The installation is not straightforward and requires some time, not simple like the 49. Right now I’m leaning towards the gas guzzling, oil burning, maintenance heavy Onan on the 318 and putting the 54 plow on the 332. Looks like we’ll be getting plowable snow on Monday!
 

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Pretty interesting replies so far. Heres what I was taught years ago.
A diesel makes torque because the stroke of the piston is longer. That stroke length is what makes the torque. The expanding gases have a longer time to drive the piston down. Jetjoe touched on this with the under square/ over square description.
Given 2 similar size engines, 1 gas, 1 diesel, the longer stroke of the diesel will make more torque. Also be able to do it longer and use less fuel.
I enjoy my 318 tractor, but the 332 has more power. I'm not able to prove it with a chart though, just from using them both for the same tasks. The diesel wins hands down.
The smoke and smell is what a lot of people dont like, but I think it's a nice fragrance, lol. I've been inhaling it for 23 years now, lol. Now gear oil stinks, smells like duck crap, cant stand it.

Another tidbit of useless info, lol. Diesel engines weren't intended to run on diesel fuel. Rudolf Diesel created it to run on peanut oil. Dont know when/why is was changed though. I have heard that diesel fuel is a by product of refining for gas. So it may have been for profit, not us, the oil companies.
Theres my .02, lol. Back to work now, got a deck to wire wheel and oil, leaves to pick up and so on.
Happy Thanksgiving everyone!
 

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So, if a diesel is the 'Cat's Meow' then why don't people convert to diesel when doing a repower? I mean your already spending a lot of bucks on the repower, why not take the plunge and go whole hog?
 

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So, if a diesel is the 'Cat's Meow' then why don't people convert to diesel when doing a repower? I mean your already spending a lot of bucks on the repower, why not take the plunge and go whole hog?
What diesels are available for repower?
 
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