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I had never heard of those referred to as a Dutchman joint. I have never used one in my woodworking projects but I understand the technique of integrating them. I like them for their artistic beauty along with their functionality. I have recently been making Epoxy Filled tables and these are a great way to stabilize wood slabs that have cracks/voids, these cracks/voids are what gives the tables character. I just have not had the piece of wood yet that needs a bowtie but I am looking forward to that day.
 

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They are fun to do. I am I big fan of accepting a peice of woods flaws and making something beautiful come out of them. Hence using all the antique pine in the table. Lots of flaws! The bowties, dutchman, butterfly etc joints are a great way to do that. I have not tried epoxy yet. Its on my list though! I would love to see a picture of your work. Not trying to take over this thread with woodworking though lol
 

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Sounds like a weird game until you figure out it’s bags of corn being tossed through a board, and then it’s just a goofy name. Guess the same could be applied to hot dogs...
 

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Well, got my parts...both JD new idler pulleys, for less than $45. My worry was whether they have the bearing pressed in...couldn't really tell from the online parts catalog. Well, they do...complete idler pulley assemblies. Now if I can tear myself away from the chaos on TV, I'll run out to the garage and start soaking the bolt holding the upper pulley on the mule drive with Liquid Wrench...a good product, I think, and much less smelly than PB Blaster. I like Blaster, but my boss and bride, the laundry/wardrobe CPO doesn't...so trying other products as I can.
 

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Discovered that I need two spacers, essentially bushing inserts, to fit into both pulley hubs before I can complete my mule drive pulley replacement project on my 212. So I ordered the inserts/spacers from the dealer, part number M81839, and should get those Saturday...cost of about $10. I tried to press the spacers out of one of the old pulleys I took off of the mule drive, but mother nature has them stuck in there TIGHT and I don't have a press to do the job right...just a bench-top vise. Below is a photo of both pulleys, new on top...old on bottom. You can see the spacers in the old pulleys, looks like they slip into the pulley hubs. So slow progress, but progress nonetheless. Mods if you think this should be moved to the Gear Drive forum, please do so. Oh yeah, forgot to note that the pulley(s) on the left are the bottom pulley on the mule drive, those on the right are the top pulley on the mule drive. Hope this info can help others.
JD212MuleDrivePulleys.jpg
 

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My dealer gave me the teflon spacers for my mule drive,even added them to my order as I had not ordered them
 
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Did somebody mention bushings and spacers?
262647
 

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My spacers are in...should pick them up this morning. Wish me luck.
Update: got my spacers/bushings...some kind of metal, not nylon. They fit the hubs of the new pulleys well. Total cost so far to refresh the mule drive pulleys on the 212 with manual PTO is less than $60. The shop supervisor is demanding some time down the trail, so it will be later until I can post up a pix of the spacers, put the new pulleys on and rat race around the yard a little on the 212...it's wet so gotta be nice to the wintergrass.
Update: Okay, muledrive refresh accomplished. Below is a photo of the pulleys and spacers/bushings, with parts numbers shown. Torque value for the pulley bolts/nuts is 35 ft lbs. according to the service manual. Belt reinstalled and tightened, PTO engaging like a champ and it seems quieter. I believe the lack of a washer under the bolt head on the lower mule drive pulley may have contributed to the eventual bearing failure. Didn't notice the lack of a washer on the lower pulley until I got the upper pulley off and noticed the washer covers the head of the bearing under it. Lesson learned. Installed a similar size/thickness washer from my hoard and all is right with the 212 again. Now that I'm all set to mow wintergrass or get the last leaves up again, we're due for snow tonight. Go figure...Mother Nature is a fickle gal sometimes.
212pulleypix2.jpg
 

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Our '01 ranger has not been cooperating in starting the past 2 weeks. I assumed got water in the gas and it freezing up with temps in teens and twenties at night. Would have to put torpedo heater blasting underneath and after about 15 minutes it would start and run fine until next day or so. I added 4 cans of dry gas a couple of times and can of Seafoam last Thursday when I filled with gas. Thought the problem was fixed as it started and ran fine since then. Wife goes to start it this morning and no go. Put heater underneath and it started five minutes later.
While out today I picked up a fuel filter. Changed it out tonight and found this. Don't think it was ever changed.
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The black stuff came out when I drained out filter. You could also see water in there. Cut it open and no wonder. We bought truck 6 years ago with 275k miles. It now has 324k miles. Guess I should have changed it sooner. Might pull the tank too to see what's in there.
 
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John, good find on ranger. You’re probably right that it may never have been changed. I myself would not pull tank unless pump goes out. There is also a check valve built into sending unit that holds gas in lines and fuel rail on engine that can go bad causing hard starts. Engine turns over till pump catches up. I have a 2007 focus that has a bad one. I usually cycle key a couple times before cranking to help refill fuel rail after it has sit very long. Only fix is to drop tank and replace complete fuel pump and sending unit. You can check for this by removing the sensor on fuel rail to check for pressure remaining on rail after engine is shut off. Make sure it has cooled off before doing this. Good luck
 

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John, good find on ranger. You’re probably right that it may never have been changed. I myself would not pull tank unless pump goes out. There is also a check valve built into sending unit that holds gas in lines and fuel rail on engine that can go bad causing hard starts. Engine turns over till pump catches up. I have a 2007 focus that has a bad one. I usually cycle key a couple times before cranking to help refill fuel rail after it has sit very long. Only fix is to drop tank and replace complete fuel pump and sending unit. You can check for this by removing the sensor on fuel rail to check for pressure remaining on rail after engine is shut off. Make sure it has cooled off before doing this. Good luck
Thanks. Dropping tank will only happen if this does not fix the issue. As long as it starts, I'm good. This was a Wisconsin truck originally and then came to NY. With the amount of rust underneath, the fewer bolts and parts removed, the better.
Went this morning, 24 deg. F, and it started right up(y)(y)(y)
 

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Wow. That's one of the dirtiest filters I've ever seen. Looks like rubber residue. One of my old Ford tractors had a filter and gas line full of crap like that from a hose that disintegrated from the inside out. The filter on my '96 was oiled and looks like new but there could still be evil on the inside so I plan to replace it.

The bolts for the tank straps will likely be a PITA to get to and remove. It's an 'if it ain't broke don't fix it' kind of thing. My '96 has always been well oiled and the straps weren't too bad but my '93 Splash straps were a bee with an itch. The front strap was a real pain to get out of the triangular slot on the frame too. Not much room with the tank still in the truck for wiggling and twisting it, and I had it up on my hoist. Laying on my back on the floor would have been pretty aggravating.

262736
 
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Sometimes if you have help, easier to pull bed off instead of dropping tank. Wiring harness unplugs, unbolt fuel door, and 6-8 bed bolts. Much easier on fuel line fittings too.
 

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Wow. That's one of the dirtiest filters I've ever seen. Looks like rubber residue. One of my old Ford tractors had a filter and gas line full of crap like that from a hose that disintegrated from the inside out. The filter on my '96 was oiled and looks like new but there could still be evil on the inside so I plan to replace it.

The bolts for the tank straps will likely be a PITA to get to and remove. It's an 'if it ain't broke don't fix it' kind of thing. My '96 has always been well oiled and the straps weren't too bad but my '93 Splash straps were a bee with an itch. The front strap was a real pain to get out of the triangular slot on the frame too. Not much room with the tank still in the truck for wiggling and twisting it, and I had it up on my hoist. Laying on my back on the floor would have been pretty aggravating.

View attachment 262736
Sometimes if you have help, easier to pull bed off instead of dropping tank. Wiring harness unplugs, unbolt fuel door, and 6-8 bed bolts. Much easier on fuel line fittings too.
No lift, so bed would come off. I'm not lying on cold concrete. Could ask my friend to use his lift but he's always got someone else's car on it.
Army, that is one clean truck underneath. That filter in your pic is the same I got from Napa, while the old one was half the diameter. Supposedly used the larger filter for build date after 05/2001. My build date was 08/2001.
 

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Pulling/lifting the bed for access to the tank is the way to go if the tank strap bolts/nuts are toast. Did this decades ago on my 90 F150 with dual tanks when I need to change both in-tank fuel pumps. Got the local mechanic to loosen the bed bolts with his impact ($5), drive it home, disconnected everything, raised the driver's side of the bed enough to get tank/pump access, changed pumps, put the bed down, reconnected everything. Bob's yer uncle...took less than 2 hours, even with the nosy neighbor watching and distracting me. I also remember that you can depressurize the fuel lines before you start changing the filter by activating the fuel shutoff switch if you have one...on my Ford it was up under the glove box. And it required a $10 plastic tool to release the special fuel filter/line clamps. Don't ask what those fuel pumps cost.
 

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The fuel pump on the Chevy Silverado is also an expensive item...I had the dealer replace mine when it became less reliable due to age as the truck had a steel shell on the bed and I was pretty sure that the job was beyond my non-existent shop capabilities at the time as I was living in my RV and had no garage. These pumps are cooled by the fuel, so it is good idea to keep a half tank or more of gas to maximize the pump life...

Chuck
 
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