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I have never had much luck cleaning the female end of the electric plugs used in JD wiring harnesses.

What do you guys in the know use? OK. Thank you in advance. Could you supply Model Number and Place of Purchase?
 

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I took a grinder to a metal finger nail file, to make it fit in the plug and scrape the contact surfaces
 

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Electrical contacts typically have a very thin plated surface so abrasion should be avoided if possible. Spray cans of 'contact cleaner' will take most oxidation off if used per the directions on the product. IDEAL makes one and theirs is product number 40-610 ... Lowe's carries it among several other retailers.
http://www.lowes.com/pd_172753-12704-40-610_0__?productId=3127949

You should also be aware that if the contacts have been getting hot due to poor connections, the spring force of the female contact may be substantially less than the original, and the problem may reappear even if you thoroughly clean all contact surfaces.

Dielectric grease is a very good idea at reassembly to keep air off the metal interfaces and extend the life of the contacts...

Chuck
 

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I'll confirm Chuck's comments about abrasion/mechanical cleaning, and problems with overheated contacts that have annealed the spring action.

The primary product I use is Caig Deoxit D5.
http://store.caig.com/s.nl/sc.2/category.188/.f

Caig products are well-known in the electronics industry, and recommended by computer and instrumentation manufacturers. Use sparingly, and one tin of D5-S6 will serve you for years.

Many connectors can be disassembled to get access to the metal parts. Look horizontally into the connector with a bright light, and if you see a spring tab holding the metal piece in the connector, use a jeweler's screwdriver or a paper clip to depress the tab and slide the contact out of the connector body. Make sure you reinsert the contact in the correct hole in the body after cleaning, and that the tab locks the contact in place.

Files, sandpaper, pencil erasers, and such are not advisable. If I need to remove corrosion verdegris from a brass/bronze connector, I use a toothbrush dipped in household ammonia. Rinse with water, allow to dry, and finish with a shot of Deoxit on assembly.

About the only solution for badly-overheated and annealed connectors is replacement.

Hank
 

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Although I agree with Mike,I do think that Hank has the best advise on this problem.Thanks Hank,I wonder if we can get that "north of the Border"
 

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From what I could find using Hank's product,no distributers in Canada
 

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I will refresh my comment now. I have used CAIG stuff for years fixing amplifiers and such. Good product and really does the job. My comments come from the fact that most of the time, with high current and low voltage situations such as JD's, the connectors are toast and the plastic housing are melted. 12v and 10a's or so get hot and usually they go bye-bye. Same with vintage car connectors. You can usually get Caig stuff through Parts Express, if they ship to canyada without massive haz fees. Mike.
 

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I'll confirm Chuck's comments about abrasion/mechanical cleaning, and problems with overheated contacts that have annealed the spring action.

The primary product I use is Caig Deoxit D5.
http://store.caig.com/s.nl/sc.2/category.188/.f

Caig products are well-known in the electronics industry, and recommended by computer and instrumentation manufacturers. Use sparingly, and one tin of D5-S6 will serve you for years.

Many connectors can be disassembled to get access to the metal parts. Look horizontally into the connector with a bright light, and if you see a spring tab holding the metal piece in the connector, use a jeweler's screwdriver or a paper clip to depress the tab and slide the contact out of the connector body. Make sure you reinsert the contact in the correct hole in the body after cleaning, and that the tab locks the contact in place.

Files, sandpaper, pencil erasers, and such are not advisable. If I need to remove corrosion verdegris from a brass/bronze connector, I use a toothbrush dipped in household ammonia. Rinse with water, allow to dry, and finish with a shot of Deoxit on assembly.

About the only solution for badly-overheated and annealed connectors is replacement.

Hank
Good post Hank,.
Ill add that your john deere dealer can supply you with new male and female spade connectors with the lock tab,. So you can replace 1 or all the connectors in the molded body,. Also google PICO they make some of the molded bodies if yours is melted, Eric
 

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I use a dental pick and one of those floss brushes with contact cleaner. if that don't work then time to improvise
 
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